Q:

How do I evict my daughter?

A:

Quick Answer

To evict a daughter, give her a written eviction notice, indicates Eviction Resources. If she does not leave within the time frame specified by state law, visit the local courthouse and file an eviction case. Attend the scheduled hearing. If the judge approves the eviction and your daughter still does not leave, Landlordology notes you have the right to ask law enforcement to have your daughter escorted from the home.

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Full Answer

The process of evicting a family member is exactly the same as evicting a tenant, according to Eviction Resources. While family relationships may make the situation emotionally different, the process is the same. Since there is usually no lease involved with a family member, states usually instruct homeowners to treat the situation the same as a month-to-month rental. Each state has individual laws regarding the eviction process, but according to Eviction Resources, most states require that the homeowner provides a written notice of eviction before taking the situation to court. Homeowners may never remove a tenant's property, physically remove the tenant, lock the tenant out, shut off essential utilities or harass the tenant, states Landlordology. The eviction notice should include a deadline to pay and the amount owed. It should be taped to the front door and also sent via certified mail with a return receipt requested from the U.S. Postal Service, indicates Landlordology.

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