Q:

How is a default judgment collected in Texas?

A:

Quick Answer

Collecting a default judgment in Texas is possible through a garnishment lawsuit, abstracts of judgment or through the debtor's simple payment, according to the Law Office of Tom M. Thomas II. A debtor with a default judgment in Texas can choose to pay the debt owed immediately to avoid facing other legal actions.

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Full Answer

When a debtor pays the amount in full after the default judgment, the problem is solved in the creditor's mind, and the debtor does not face additional hardship due to the debt. Many debtors are not in a position to pay for the entire debt at once, so the creditors push for other payment measures to ensure that they receive their money.

One of these payment options is a garnishment lawsuit. A creditor files the garnishment lawsuit against the debtor's bank, which prompts the bank to put a hold on the debtor's account. If the creditor wins the lawsuit, the bulk of the debtor's bank account goes to the creditor to pay the full sum.

The other payment option is an abstract of judgment. An abstract of judgment is when the creditor files an abstract with the county records custodian to orchestrate a lien against the property. This makes it nearly impossible for the debtor to sell or buy real estate while the judgment lien is in place. This can help force the debtor to pay the debt.

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