Q:

What is a class E felony in New York?

A:

Quick Answer

According to reference.com, the New York penal codes identify several types of Class E felonies. Common Class E felonies include: contempt of court and child abandonment or abuse. Class E felonies include various criminal acts, such as female genital mutilation, placing a false bomb and unlawfully concealing a will.

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Full Answer

Those convicted of Class E felonies can face prison terms from 16 months to 4 years. New York City Arraignments, provides a comprehensive list of New York Class E felonies, from criminal defense attorneys Shalley and Murray. The alphabetical list starts with abandonment of a child, abortion in the second degree, absconding from a community treatment facility, and absconding from temporary release in the first degree. Some of the aggravated felonies include: aggravated assault upon a person less than eleven years old, aggravated harassment in the first degree and aggravated harassment of an employee by an inmate. The list continues with arson in the fourth degree, auto-stripping in the second degree and bail jumping in the second degree.

New York Class E felonies that start with the letter "C" include: cemetery desecration in the first degree,

commercial bribe receiving in the first degree, and commercial bribing in the first degree. This level of felony includes some computer crimes, such as computer tampering in the third degree and computer trespass. Class E felonies include conspiracy in the fourth degree and numerous criminal acts, including:

criminal anarchy, criminal contempt in the first degree, criminal diversion of prescription medications third degree, criminal facilitation in the third degree, criminal impersonation in the first degree, criminal injection of a narcotic drug, and criminal interference with health care services or religious worship in the first degree.

These felonies include criminal mischief in the third degree and criminal nuisance in the first degree as well. Criminal possession Class E felonies include: criminal possession of computer-related material, criminal possession of marijuana in the third degree, criminal possession of precursors of controlled substances, criminal possession of public benefit cards in the third degree and criminal possession of stolen property in the fourth degree.

Other Class E felonies include: criminal sale of marijuana in the third degree, criminal solicitation in the third degree, criminal use of a public benefit card in the first degree, criminal use of an access device in the first degree, criminal usury in the second degree and criminally negligent homicide. Class E felony possession crimes include: possessing a sexual performance by a child, possessing an obscene sexual performance by a child and possession of gambling records in the first degree. Class E felony sex crimes include rape in the third degree and sodomy in the third degree.

Class E felony offenses regarding tampering include: tampering with a consumer product in the first degree, tampering with a sports contest in the first degree, tampering with a witness in the third degree and tampering with physical evidence. Other unlawful activities categorized as Class E felonies include: unlawful duplication of computer-related material, unlawful grand jury disclosure, unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, unlawful use of secret scientific material, unlawfully concealing a will and unlawfully using slugs in the first degree. This level felony also includes vehicular assault in the second degree and welfare fraud in the fourth degree

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