Q:

How do you get Canadian citizenship?

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Quick Answer

As of November 2014, one can become a Canadian citizen by earning permanent-resident status for four years as an adult, 18 years or older, knowing Canada's responsibilities of citizenship and submitting an application. For Canadian citizenship, one must communicate in one of the country's two official languages, notes the Canadian government.

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Full Answer

Applications for immigration to Canada are available through programs for workers, family sponsorships, refugees, live-in caregivers and start-up visas. Permanent residents have similar rights that other Canadians do, including access to health care. A permanent resident is someone who immigrates to Canada and lives in the country for extended periods of time, as referenced by the Government of Canada.

Applicants for Canadian citizenship must speak, write and read French or English, in order to understand fellow Canadians. They are required to know Canadian history, geography, government and recognize the privileges of citizenship, as stated by the Government of Canada. Individuals who are 55 years and older do not have as many requirements for citizenship, such as knowing the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

Applicants must fill out necessary citizenship paperwork. As of February 2014, all applications require a $300 new processing fee, plus a $100 right-of-citizenship fee, for a total of $400 in Canadian currency. Pay for the citizenship applications online or at any financial institution in Canada, according to the Canadian government.

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