Q:

What does "bound over for trial" mean?

A:

Quick Answer

In legal terms, the phrase "bound over for trial" indicates that a judge believes that there is probable cause for a case to proceed to trial, according to the American Bar Association. Probable cause means that there is enough evidence to credibly suggest a defendant's guilt.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

If the court finds that the prosecution lacks sufficient probable cause to proceed to trial, the judge may dismiss the case, as detailed by the American Bar Association. The process by which a defendant is bound over for trial is called a preliminary hearing, and it is similar to the process by which a grand jury may deliver an indictment.

Learn more about Law
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between a pre-trial and a trial?

    A:

    Pre-trial proceedings occur before a criminal trial and differ depending on whether the offense is categorized as a misdemeanor or a felony, reports the American Bar Association. The proceedings vary by state.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the procedure for dealing with court judgements?

    A:

    The procedure for dealing with a lower court's judgment involves affirmation by the appeals court, thus ending the case, explains the American Bar Association. However, the losing party may appeal the case to a higher court if there's a legal basis, such as a particular material error during the trial. The appeals court may dismiss the appeal due to jurisdiction reasons, which means the judgment remains in effect.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a summary of the Miranda v. Arizona case?

    A:

    In the Miranda v. Arizona case in 1966, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the police must give suspects specific warnings prior to custodial interrogations, notes Brooks Holland for the American Bar Association. The court ruled that the police must inform a suspect of his right to remain silent and his right to an attorney, and must tell him he will be provided with an attorney if he cannot afford one and what he says can be used against him.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you make your own case?

    A:

    Thoroughly review the law and procedures pertaining to your case to represent yourself effectively in court, recommends the American Bar Association. Legal books and public service websites are a good source of information for state law, as are non-profit and court-run organizations.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore