Q:

What is a bill of particulars?

A:

Quick Answer

A bill of particulars is a statement that a plaintiff or defendant submits to another party in response to the party's request for the same and contains detailed information about the defense that the defendant intends to use in the case or details of the charges leveled against the defendant, according to the New York City Civil Court. In most cases, a party must submit the bill of particulars within 30 days following receipt of the other party's request.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

A bill of particulars contains responses to all queries that the party seeking the document asked, notes the New York City Civil Court. It also contains the name the submitting party and the case name and index number. After preparing the bill of particulars, the party must legalize the document by signing it in the presence of an attorney. Sending a copy of the document to the requesting party and submitting the original document to the court dealing with the case completes the process. The sending party must retain a copy of the document as well.

Failure to submit the bill of particulars with the specified time frame may prompt the court to punish the failing party or force the party to submit the statement, states the New York City Civil Court. However, a party may decide to file a written objection to the request for the bill of particulars. In this case, the party must submit the objection within 30 days following receipt of the request. Asking ambiguous questions and demanding unnecessary information are some of the reasons that may prompt the objection.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

Explore