Geography

A:

Some major landforms of Europe include the Alps, Balkan Peninsula, Iberian Peninsula, Danube River and Northern European Lowlands. The landforms that create the boundary between Europe and Asia include the Bosporus, Dardanelles, Sea of Marmara, Black Sea, Caspian Sea, Caucasus Mountains and Ural River.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
    • What countries does the Sahara Desert cover?

      Q: What countries does the Sahara Desert cover?

      A: The Sahara Desert covers large parts of the African countries of Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Western Sahara, Sudan and Tunisia. The desert has an area of over 3.6 million square miles, covering around one-quarter of the continent of Africa.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Does it snow in Africa?

      Q: Does it snow in Africa?

      A: While many assume that Africa as mainly desert, it is a diverse continent that sees a fair amount of snowfall away from the countries near the equator. Snowfall in Africa is rare, occurring in mountainous regions and in isolated incidences.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What are the best tips for surviving in the desert?

      Q: What are the best tips for surviving in the desert?

      A: Desert survival depends on protection from the elements, including the extreme temperatures that can be experienced both during the day and at night, with heat stroke, dehydration and hypothermia all posing risks to human health and safety. The biggest tip for desert survival is to be prepared for the climate, which means being equipped with proper gear and clothing in addition to adequate supplies of water and food, which are not naturally plentiful in most desert areas.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What is the hottest desert in the world?

      Q: What is the hottest desert in the world?

      A: The Lut Desert is the hottest desert on Earth, based on satellite calculations that measure the land skin temperature of the entire surface of the planet. The 2005 reading of the Lut Desert was 159.3 degrees Fahrenheit. The Lut Desert is located in the southeast of Iran.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What are Africa's most deadly snakes?

      Q: What are Africa's most deadly snakes?

      A: Africa is home to a number of highly venomous snakes, including the black mamba, the puff adder and the Egyptian cobra. The black mamba may be the deadliest snake found on the African continent, with a venom so powerful that a single dose can kill as many as 12 adult humans.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • In which country did apartheid take place?

      Q: In which country did apartheid take place?

      A: Apartheid took place in the Republic of South Africa. The apartheid laws were associated with racial discrimination and supremacy of whites. These laws lasted from 1948 to 1991 in South Africa.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • See More Africa Questions
    • How can we protect Antarctica?

      Q: How can we protect Antarctica?

      A: Protection of Antarctica, its surrounding oceans and its biodiversity requires concerted efforts to minimize human impact on a global level. Efforts include minimizing the number of tourists, closely regulating commercial activities in the region, addressing the issue of worldwide climate change and establishing internationally recognized sanctuaries, standards and systems of oversight.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Who owns Antarctica?

      Q: Who owns Antarctica?

      A: Antarctica is not owned by any country, per the Antarctic Treaty. Before the Antarctic Treaty was signed, seven countries claimed parts of the continent, including Australia, the United Kingdom, Chile, Argentina, Norway, France and New Zealand. The treaty recognizes none of these claims.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What are the names of some cities in Antarctica?

      Q: What are the names of some cities in Antarctica?

      A: There are no true cities on the continent of Antarctica; instead, there are approximately 24 research stations with populations ranging from 1,000 to 4,000 people. The research stations are designed for scientific studies only, and they do not support tourism.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What prevents the resources of Antarctica from being used?

      Q: What prevents the resources of Antarctica from being used?

      A: The Antarctic Treaty, signed in 1959 by 12 countries, prevents mining in Antarctica. As of 2014, 49 countries have joined in this pact. The treaty also protects the continent from disposal of nuclear waste and testing of nuclear weapons but encourages scientific research.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Which continents does the Arctic Circle pass through?

      Q: Which continents does the Arctic Circle pass through?

      A: The Arctic Circle passes through three continents: Asia, Europe and North America. This includes eight countries: Russia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Finland, the United States (Alaska), Denmark (Greenland) and Iceland.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Do people live in Antarctica?

      Q: Do people live in Antarctica?

      A: There are no permanent residents of Antarctica. However, there are many research stations in Antarctica that are populated throughout the year by professionals sent to study the continent.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • See More Antarctica Questions
    • How can you find shelter in sub-zero climates?

      Q: How can you find shelter in sub-zero climates?

      A: When there is snow in sub-zero temperatures, it's possible to build shelter using loose snow or snow blocks, depending on how tightly the snow is packed. The exact type of shelter you can build depends on whether you have equipment, like snow shovels and saws.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Can puffer fish really kill you?

      Q: Can puffer fish really kill you?

      A: When eaten, pufferfish is indeed toxic enough to kill a human. The tetrodotoxin found in the fish's organs, including its liver, is strong enough to bring about respiratory failure. There is no known antidote to this toxin, and the pufferfish species that do carry it carry enough to kill multiple people.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What is Asia's archipelago?

      Q: What is Asia's archipelago?

      A: The archipelago of Asia forms the largest group of islands in the world and is called the Malay Archipelago. The archipelago is made up of 17,000 islands belonging to Indonesia, 7,000 belonging to the Philippines and the island of New Guinea.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • On which continent is Iraq located?

      Q: On which continent is Iraq located?

      A: Iraq is located on the continent of Asia. It is a part of the Middle East, a region of Asia and North Africa that nurtured some of the oldest human cultures on the planet.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What is bird's nest soup?

      Q: What is bird's nest soup?

      A: Bird's nest soup is a dish that is literally what it sounds like: a soup made of bird's nests. However, this soup is made of a specific type of bird nest that is formed through an extrusion of the bird's saliva rather than an assemblage of twigs and other materials.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Where is Arabia?

      Q: Where is Arabia?

      A: Arabia, also known as the Arabian Peninsula, is located on the Asian continent, just across the Red Sea from Egypt. It is bounded by the Persian Gulf on the northeast and the Arabian Sea to the south.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • See More Asia Questions
    • Which fish's sting is so strong that the pain alone could kill you?

      Q: Which fish's sting is so strong that the pain alone could kill you?

      A: The reef stonefish is dangerous because its sting causes intense pain that can actually be strong enough to kill a person. In this case, death is brought about as a result of the shock caused by the extreme pain that accompanies a stonefish's sting.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Where is Sydney, Australia located?

      Q: Where is Sydney, Australia located?

      A: Sydney, Australia, is located in the state of New South Wales, which is on the country's southeast coast along the Tasman Sea. It is located to the east of the Blue Mountains, to the south of the Hawkesbury River and to the north of Royal National Park.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Did Australians invent the boomerang?

      Q: Did Australians invent the boomerang?

      A: Though boomerangs are iconically associated with Australian Aboriginal peoples, it's difficult to know exactly when and where this tool originated. Ancient humans used boomerangs for thousands of years before the advent of more modern tools. The oldest-known boomerang is thought to be about 20,000 years old and was actually found in Poland.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Which spider has bigger fangs than a snake?

      Q: Which spider has bigger fangs than a snake?

      A: A combination of large fangs and strong venom makes the Sydney funnel-web spider one of the deadliest spiders on the planet. Certainly the most dangerous spider in Australia, which has no shortage of dangerous arachnids, the Sydney funnel-web spider will display its fangs when threatened.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • Which type of deadly jellyfish is nearly invisible?

      Q: Which type of deadly jellyfish is nearly invisible?

      A: The Irukandji jellyfish, which is a highly venomous type of Australian box jellyfish, has nearly invisible tentacles and a tiny, transparent bell that makes it very hard to see. Though the Irukandji's bell is typically less than an inch wide, its translucent tentacles, which contain venomous darts, can be up to 3 feet long.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • What makes the Portuguese man-of-war unique?

      Q: What makes the Portuguese man-of-war unique?

      A: While the Portuguese man-of-war may look like a jellyfish, it's actually a siphonophore. Also known as simply "man-of-war" or "bluebottle," this complex creature is a colony of smaller individual organisms known as zooids. Though separate, the organisms that make up the Portuguese man-of-war work together and rely on each other for survival.
      See Full Answer
      Filed Under:
    • See More Australia Questions