What Are the Regions in Italy?

What Are the Regions in Italy?

What Are the Regions in Italy?

The United Nations' nomenclature of Territorial units for statistics divides Italy into the macro-regions of North-West, North-East, Central, Southern and Islands. Italy's provincial regions all fall within these macro-regions.

The North-West macro-region is made up of Aosta Valley, Piedmonte, Lombardy and Liguria. Emilia-Romagna, Veneto, Trentino-South Tyrol and Friuli-Venezia Giulia make up the North-East macro-region. The Central macro-region is comprised of Tuscany, Marche, Umbria and Lazio. Abruzzo, Campania, Molise, Puglia, Basilicata and Cambria are the regions of the Southern macro-region. Sardinia and Sicily are the only two members of the Islands macro-region.

The major city of the North-West macro-region is Milan. The North-East's major city is Bologna. Rome is the Central macro-region's major city and Naples that of the South. Palermo, in Sicily, is the major city of the Islands' macro-region.

The regions and macro-regions have a large variety of climates, foods and topographies. The North is dominated by the Alps and is the coolest region of the country. The South has a warm, Mediterranean climate.

Of the 20 regions, 15 have ordinary statutes and five have special statutes awarded because of their individual circumstances. These special regions are Sardinia, Sicily, Trentino-Soutyh Tyrol, Aosta Valley and Friuli-Venezia Giulia. These regions effectively have home rule and keep between 60 percent (Friuli-Venezia Giulia) and 100 percent (Sardinia) of all taxes raised.