Greece

A:

Crops that grow in Greece include tomatoes, wheat, corn, sugar beets, pistachios, oranges, olive oil, peaches, nectarines, barley, apples, cotton, rice, figs, almonds, watermelons and tobacco. Greece was the largest producer of cotton and pistachios in the European Union as of 2010 and was the second-largest producer of rice and olives.

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  • How is the geography of Rome similar to the geography of Greece?

    Q: How is the geography of Rome similar to the geography of Greece?

    A: There are a few similarities between the geography of Rome, or Italy, and Greece, such as mountains, latitude and the Mediterranean Sea. Rome itself is bound by mountains on one side and the Mediterranean Sea on the other, typical geography for much of Greece.
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  • What is the climate like in Greece?

    Q: What is the climate like in Greece?

    A: Greece experiences a dry-summer subtropical climate, which is commonly referred to as the Mediterranean climate, according to the Köppen climate-classification system. The two main seasons of the Mediterranean climate are a rainy and mild winter that lasts from October to March and a warm, dry summer that lasts from April to September. There are typically long periods of sunshine throughout the year.
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  • What is the capital city of Greece?

    Q: What is the capital city of Greece?

    A: Athens is the capital city of Greece. This city of 3.252 million people was designated the capital of Greece in 1833 immediately after the country won its independence from the Ottoman Empire.
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  • What is the longest river in Greece?

    Q: What is the longest river in Greece?

    A: The Haliacmon is the longest river in Greece, running approximately 200 miles through the country. This river formed Lake Kastoria and continues to feed it. The Haliacmon is also known as the Aliakmon or the Aliakmonas River.
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  • What are the major bodies of water in Greece?

    Q: What are the major bodies of water in Greece?

    A: Greece is surrounded by large bodies of water, including the Ionian Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the Sea of Crete, the Thracian Sea and the Aegean Sea. The country's many islands are all located in these five seas.
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  • What crops grow in Greece?

    Q: What crops grow in Greece?

    A: Crops that grow in Greece include tomatoes, wheat, corn, sugar beets, pistachios, oranges, olive oil, peaches, nectarines, barley, apples, cotton, rice, figs, almonds, watermelons and tobacco. Greece was the largest producer of cotton and pistachios in the European Union as of 2010 and was the second-largest producer of rice and olives.
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  • Q: What are common stereotypes of Greeks?

    A: Common stereotypes that are associated with Greeks include being loud, hairy, carefree, smokers and attachment to the opposite sex parent. While these stereotypes do not pertain to all Greeks, they seem to be quite strongly associated with Greeks and have been difficult to shake.
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  • Q: Where is Greece?

    A: The country of Greece is located in south-central Europe and to the east of Italy. It is bordered by Albania, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north and juts out into the Mediterranean Sea.
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  • Q: What is the typical climate of Greece?

    A: The typical climate of Greece is hot and sunny in the summer without much rain. Winters have moderate temperatures and more rain. Small amounts of snow can occasionally be expected in Athens.
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  • What is the national animal of Greece?

    Q: What is the national animal of Greece?

    A: The national animal of Greece is the dolphin, which is associated with the Greek god Delphinus. Greece's national bird is the mythical phoenix; its national flower is the violet; and the national tree is the olive tree.
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  • Q: What are the major landforms of Greece?

    A: The major landforms of Greece are islands, hills, mountains and volcanoes. Almost 1,500 islands belong to Greece, some of which contain extinct and inactive volcanoes.
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  • Q: Who primarily used a stoa?

    A: A stoa is a long, covered pathway surrounding a building that was used primarily in ancient Greece. These structures allowed Greek citizens to meet and conduct business even on rainy days and enabled the social and political discourse unique to Greece during the Classical Period.
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  • Why is Athens famous?

    Q: Why is Athens famous?

    A: Athens, the capital of Greece, is famous for its art and architecture, prominent thinkers, the Acropolis, the original Olympic Games and democracy. The ancient city-state of Athens derived its name from the Greek goddess of wisdom, Athena, who the people considered the patron of the city.
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  • Q: What is the population of Athens, Greece?

    A: Athens, Greece, had an estimated population of over 3.4 million people as of 2011. Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece and is located near the eastern coast of central Greece. Greece is estimated to have a total population of almost 10.8 million people as of 2014.
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  • Q: What are some interesting facts about Greece?

    A: All Greek must serve at least one year in the Greek military, and all Greeks over the age of 18 must vote in elections. Greece has the 10th longest coastline in the world, and no point in Greece is more than 85 miles from some body of water. Much of this coastline comes from islands, of which Greece contains more than 2,000, though less than 200 are inhabited.
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  • What four countries border Greece?

    Q: What four countries border Greece?

    A: Greece is bordered by four countries: Albania, the Republic of Macedonia, Bulgaria and Turkey. To the west, Greece is bordered by the Ionian Sea, and to the east is the Aegean Sea.
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  • Q: What is some information about the Greek Island of Navarone?

    A: The Greek island of Navarone is actually named Leros. The island became famous after World War II when it was the site of the Great Battle of Leros.
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  • Q: What are Girl Scout Brownies called in Greece?

    A: Girl Scout Brownies are called Asteri Stars in Greece. Asteri Stars are between the ages of 5 and 7. In the United States, Brownies are second and third graders, which means they're typically 6 to 8 years old.
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  • Q: What was the form of government of the Phoenicians?

    A: The oldest political system of the ancient Phoenicians was based on a monarchy under the direct rule of a king. This type of government was later replaced by a republic in one of Phoenicia's important cities. Several centuries later, a federal form of government was established, which united three major states.
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  • Q: What is the population of Athens?

    A: As of 2014, the estimated population of Athens, Greece, is 665,000. This number is a drop of over 100,000 residents since 2004, when the population was 796,400. The city's population decline is attributed to its aging residents and the poor economic outlook in the country.
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  • Q: What kinds of landforms did Ancient Greece have?

    A: The city-states of Greece were located on arid, wooded, mountainous peninsulas and islands. With about 80 percent of all Greek land covered in mountains, there were no cities or villages more than about 10 miles away from a mountain. There were also several active volcanoes nearby, most notably the volcano that destroyed the Minoan civilization on Santorini, which contributed to the region's frequent earthquakes.
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