Q:

Where can you find a map of the Texas fault lines?

A:

Quick Answer

A map of the Texas fault lines shows where the most and least risk areas in the state are located. The Earthquake Hazards Program, part of the U.S. Geological Survey, shows the fault lines and seismic activity risk for all of the states in the U.S.

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Full Answer

Texas is not generally a state that sees many earthquakes, but the areas with the highest risk of seismic activity include the western corner of the state near the Mexico border and along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Two fault lines in Texas are the West Lobo Valley fault zone and the Campo Grande fault.

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