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Winter Comfort Food Recipes: Broth

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When the weather turns cold, nothing warms up both body and soul like a hot bowl of soup. Whether you're making a pot of chicken noodle soup or a hearty stew, you'll want to begin with a good base for your winter recipes. Throw some chicken bones and vegetables into a pot of water, and cook up a fragrant chicken broth that will elevate even the simplest soups into a delicious and welcoming meal. This recipe for chicken broth is based on one from Food Network.

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Winter Comfort Food Recipes: Broth
Credit: CC0/NA/pxhere

Ingredients

  • Chicken bones and skin, either from a raw chicken or leftovers from a roast chicken
  • 2 stalks celery, top included, cut into chunks
  • 2 medium carrots, cut into chunks
  • 1 onion, peeled and quartered
  • Parsley
  • 5 to 8 whole black peppercorns
  • Salt to taste
  • Water

Directions

  1. Place the chicken bones and skin into a large pot. You can use bone-in pieces, if starting with a raw chicken, or just the leftover bones and skin from a previous meal. Add the vegetables, herbs and peppercorns. A basic chicken broth is fairly versatile, with room for you to adjust the seasoning according to your tastes. Try a bay leaf and fresh thyme or a teaspoon of dried rosemary. Add a pinch of salt to give the broth some depth.
  2. Pour in enough cold water to cover the chicken and vegetables. Heat the water over medium-high heat until it boils, then immediately turn the heat down to low. Let the broth simmer, skimming any foam that forms on the surface.
  3. If using chicken bones, let the broth simmer for at least three hours. If using chicken pieces with meat, remove the chicken after it's cooked through, about one hour, and let cool on a plate. You can continue to simmer the broth. Once the chicken is cool, cut the meat from the bones and either add it to your completed soup or reserve it for another use. Return the bones to the pot, and let the broth simmer for at least another two hours.
  4. Turn off the heat. Remove the bones and vegetables, and strain the remaining broth into another pot. Refrigerate until ready to use. If you plan on freezing the broth to use in later winter recipes, you can simmer it longer after you've strained it so that it reduces slightly and concentrates the flavor.
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