Q:

What is a food that does not spoil?

A:

Quick Answer

Honey is a food that doesn't spoil, according to Smithsonian.com. Several factors aid in this ability, including its high sugar and low moisture content, which work together to form an environment that is inhospitable to bacteria.

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What is a food that does not spoil?
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Full Answer

Honey has been found edible after hundreds of years. Its high sugar content pulls water out of any organism that tries to enter the substance, which kills the bacteria; this process is aided by the fact that honey is naturally acidic. Also, when bees make the honey, they use glucose oxidase. In honey, this compound turns into two other compounds, gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, which also work to destroy bacteria.

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