Q:

Can you eat the skin of a fig?

A:

Quick Answer

The skin of the fig is completely edible. The only part of the fig that should not be consumed is the stem.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Figs do not have a long shelf life. Fresh figs should be consumed or used within 24 to 48 hours of purchase.

The height of fig season in the United States is between June and September. Fresh and ripe figs will have a slightly sweet odor.

The fig fruit grows on trees. The seeds of the fig are edible and provide a crunchy texture. A ripe fig should have a medium soft touch and not be too firm. This fruit can be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator.

Learn more about Fruits & Veggies
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Is it safe to eat the skin of peaches?

    A:

    Despite its fuzzy texture, peach skin is perfectly edible, and many people eat peaches without peeling. However, according to USDA sampling, peaches can be coated with as many as nine different pesticides before arriving at the grocery store. On the Consumers Union index of pesticide toxicity, peaches ranked highest.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Can you eat mango skin?

    A:

    Mango skin, unlike its pit, is edible. The mango skin contains chemical compounds that can be beneficial to the body, including potent antioxidants, such as resvertrol and mangiferin. Mango skin tastes bitter.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the correct way to dry apples?

    A:

    The correct way to dry apples is wash them, remove soft spots, skin them (optional), and dry them. It's possible to use a food dehydrator, an oven or a car to dry the apples.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What fruit is good for constipation?

    A:

    Fruits that contain skin and seeds, such as apples, pears, raspberries and strawberries, may prevent and treat constipation because of their fiber content, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Prunes or dried plums are also good for constipation. Prunes contain fiber and sorbitol, which acts as a laxative, notes WebMD.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore