Q:

How much money do foster parents get?

A:

Quick Answer

According to a 2012 national survey, the minimum per diem for foster parents in Wisconsin is $7.23, while the maximum in Ohio is $200.00. While they don’t all differ quite that much, there is a noticeable range. Aside from Ohio’s special needs spike, the maximum tends to be between $20 and $40.

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Full Answer

The rate of pay for foster parents varies greatly from state to state. It also depends quite a bit on the individual situation and needs of the child in care.

Based on the foster child’s age, states determine needs such as clothing, food, clothing, travel and childcare when determine the amount of per diem to provide to foster parents. Foster care rate are also intended to cover the costs of housing, incidentals, a personal allowance for the child, sports, activities, school supplies and haircuts. In some states, foster parents are provided with a minimum amount that must be spent on the child for clothing, incidentals and allowance per month.

In the state of Kentucky, an advanced rate of pay is provided to foster parents who complete 24 hours of foster parent training. Additionally, foster parents can earn extra money if they are considered an emergency shelter or if they care for children who are considered medically fragile.

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