Adoption

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Specific laws about adopting vary from state to state and depend on whether the child is adopted from foster care, a private adoption agency or an international adoption organization. Generally, the adoption process includes a formal application, a background check, a home visit, a personal evaluation, approval from the adoption agency and legal paperwork finalizing the adoption.

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  • How can you trace your birth parents?

    Q: How can you trace your birth parents?

    A: According to the Independent Adoption Center, the process of finding birth parents is very difficult, but there are several steps one can take. These steps include talking to the adoptive parents, contacting the adoption agency, signing up with an adoption reunion registry, asking for an original birth certificate, conducting an online search, and looking for birth certificates at the county courthouse.
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  • Why should people consider adoption?

    Q: Why should people consider adoption?

    A: One of the best reasons to adopt is to provide a child with a stable home and caring, supportive parents. Many children put up for adoption come from bad situations or have never lived in a secure home environment. People who open their hearts and homes to such children give them a new lease on life.
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  • How can I find my biological mom?

    Q: How can I find my biological mom?

    A: Although there are many routes to finding your biological mom, About.com details a typical process. For best results, you need to find records pertaining to your adoption and have access to the Internet.
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  • How does the process of adoption work?

    Q: How does the process of adoption work?

    A: The process of adoption involves deciding if adoption is the right option, creating an adoption plan, finding a children's home or an adoptive family, contacting an adoption agency, knowing the adoptive family, getting legal help if necessary and acquiring final documentation. Adoption is a long process that demands a lot of preparation. It is vital to understand the adoption laws prior to embarking on the adoption process.
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  • What are the pros and cons of international adoption?

    Q: What are the pros and cons of international adoption?

    A: One advantage of international adoption is that the child is being removed from a hopeless situation to grow up in a country where the standard of living is greater. However, adoption laws in foreign countries can sometimes be very vague. As such, there may be gaps in the law, according to Wikipedia. Additionally, there are often language and cultural barriers for the child to deal with.
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  • How are children affected by adoption?

    Q: How are children affected by adoption?

    A: According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the process of adoption affects children in a multitude of ways, influencing their sense of identity, self-worth, self-esteem and many other social and emotional areas. Adopted children may have trouble forging meaningful, trusting relationships and may also have difficulty articulating and controlling emotions.
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  • What is the process for adoption?

    Q: What is the process for adoption?

    A: Specific laws about adopting vary from state to state and depend on whether the child is adopted from foster care, a private adoption agency or an international adoption organization. Generally, the adoption process includes a formal application, a background check, a home visit, a personal evaluation, approval from the adoption agency and legal paperwork finalizing the adoption.
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  • Q: Do free adoptions exist?

    A: Some agencies have a sliding fee scale so that people can adopt special-needs children from the foster care system at little or no cost. The federal government also has funding to help parents pay non-recurring adoption costs, such as court and attorney fees and traveling expenses.
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  • Q: How much money is a foster parent paid?

    A: Foster parents receive reimbursement from the state in which they reside, resulting in a varied answer to this question, depending on geography. A median range of foster parent reimbursement is $350 per month per child. Some states pay more than this, and some pay considerably less.
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  • Q: What are second-marriage children?

    A: Second-marriage children are also known as step-children. They are those children who retain one biological parent in the household, but have a new parent as a result of the remaining biological parent's second marriage.
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  • Q: How do you apply for adoption in South Carolina?

    A: To apply for adoption in South Carolina, contact the regional adoption office in the county or call 888-828-3555. The regional office will provide guidance on the requirements and give an application package. More information can be obtained by visiting the South Carolina Department of Social Services website, notes AdoptUSKids.
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  • Q: Where can I see pictures of children in need of homes?

    A: The Internet is rich with resources that provide pictures of children who are in need of homes. Adoption agencies and adoption websites list photos of kids in search of loving families and a place to call home, as well as information on their backgrounds and personalities.
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  • Q: Is it possible to adopt for free in Florida?

    A: It is free to adopt a child in the state of Florida if the child has been placed with the Florida Department of Families and Children as a foster child, and if the adopting family can't afford the minimal associated court costs and fees. In addition, the parenting classes and home study that are required are also free.
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  • Q: How do you start the adoption process in the state of Connecticut?

    A: The adoption process in Connecticut begins by gathering information on the Department of Children & Families (DCF) section on the State of Connecticut web portal located at CT.gov and attending an open house. These actions give prospective families the chance to learn more about the full process.
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  • Q: How can I find my birth mother in England?

    A: Persons adopted after Nov. 12, 1975 can apply for access to their original birth records through the U.K. government adoption site. Persons adopted before that date must first meet with a counselor and an approved adoption advisor, after which they can apply for access to their records.
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  • Do any states offer free legal adoption forms?

    Q: Do any states offer free legal adoption forms?

    A: The judicial branch of each state, such as the Minnesota Judicial Branch and the Colorado Judicial Branch, provides state-approved legal adoption forms free of charge. The U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs also provides links to forms for use in international adoptions.
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  • Q: How much does a birth mother get when she puts her baby up for adoption?

    A: Birth mothers cannot get paid for putting a baby up for adoption. Buying and selling human beings is illegal in the United States under laws prohibiting slavery, among others. However, many states allow the birth mother's expenses to be paid by an adoptive family.
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  • Q: How do you adopt a child in Kentucky?

    A: Adoption in Kentucky requires that eligible adults complete thirty hours of educational group meetings, a background check and home study. To be eligible to adopt in Kentucky, single or married adults must be at least 21 years of age and state residents. Prospective adoptive parents must also evidence income adequate to meet the needs of their current family, and the family residence must provide adequate sleeping and living space for the family and the child or children to be adopted.
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  • How do you go about adoption in North Carolina?

    Q: How do you go about adoption in North Carolina?

    A: To adopt a child in North Carolina, choose an adoption agency, submit an application, complete a home study and legalize the adoption in a court. Before committing to an adoption, consult other family members and find out more about adoptive children through reliable sources such as the Internet, government officials and other adoptive parents.
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  • Q: What are some facts about adoption in Wisconsin?

    A: Like many states, Older children waiting to be adopted in the state of Wisconsin have a significantly less chance of being adopted than younger children. Wisconsin also sees a much higher rate of African-American children waiting to be adopted than any other race.
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  • Q: What do I call my mother's aunt?

    A: You call your mother's aunt your great aunt. When referring to the aunt, her name is usually simply preceded by the title, as in "Aunt Mary."
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