Q:

How do you write a rebuttal speech?

A:

Quick Answer

To write a rebuttal speech, identify arguments that support your side of the issue and arguments that might defeat your position. Use supporting information to prove that your position is stronger.

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Full Answer

  1. Identify arguments that support your side

    Compare your position on the issue to your opponent's position. Identify three or four key arguments that support your position. These key arguments are the basis for each of your body paragraphs.

  2. Identify any opposing arguments that might defeat your position

    Identify any opposing arguments that your opponent might use that are stronger than your own arguments. Anticipate any objections your opponent might have to your key arguments. Think about how you can use your arguments to defeat your opponent's counter-arguments.

  3. Add supporting information

    Use supporting information to back up your arguments on the issue. Appeal to the audience's reason by pointing out logical fallacies in your opponent's argument. Appeal to the audience's emotions to get them on your side by getting sympathy or connecting with them emotionally. Use analogies or metaphors to compare your opponent's arguments to something else. This shows the audience that the arguments are unacceptable or absurd. Although you should not bring new arguments up in the rebuttal speech, it is acceptable to use new evidence and analysis.

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