What are some Hogan test examples?


Quick Answer

Hogan offers several tests including Hogan Personality Inventory, Hogan Development Survey, Motives, Values and Preferences Inventory, and Hogan Judgment test. Hogan produces psychometric tests for pre-screening job candidates and career development. Both private and government sectors use these tests.

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Full Answer

The Hogan Personality Inventory is a 206-question true-or-false test that assesses the subject's normal personality. The test predicts how an individual interacts with others and identifies leadership style. Businesses use this test during employment consideration or as a tool for developing company leaders. The test measures such things as ambition, sensitivity, adjustment and prudence.

The Hogan Development Survey is a 168-question test that measures a person's behavior under stress. The test is designed to identify strengths and weaknesses and predict subjects' decision-making when under pressure. This test identifies personality characteristics that cause career and interpersonal relationship problems and measures personality traits such as excitability, skepticism, mischievousness and imagination.

The Motives, Values and Preferences Inventory is a 200-question test that assesses subjects' values, goals, interests and motivation drivers. Employers utilize this test for understanding what motivates their associates and to place them in the right positions. The test measures values such as hedonism, recognition and power-seeking, and leadership to predict subjects' success in different positions.

The Hogan Judgment test focuses on leaders' judgment and decision-making. While previous measurements of leaders' judgment skills focus solely on intellectual properties, this test integrates personality style. The test also interprets how leaders react to feedback from failed decisions. Three components of decision making are measured information processing, decision-making factors, and reaction to feedback. The test allows leaders to make better decisions, and to recognize and react to bad decisions.

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