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A three-string bale of hay normally consists of 17 flakes weighing approximately 8 pounds each. Flakes are the way a bale splits, as detailed by Hay USA, which recommends feeding by weight rather than by flake.

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  • What is the best way to learn to speak Gaelic?

    Q: What is the best way to learn to speak Gaelic?

    A: One of the the best ways to learn to speak Gaelic, or any language, is by first listening and then repeating and speaking, much like how children learn language. However, since everyone has their own style of learning, it depends on the learner and the situation. Knowing Gaelic will allow someone to communicate with Irish speakers.
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  • What is urbanization?

    Q: What is urbanization?

    A: Urbanization refers to the number of people who migrate from rural areas to urban areas, resulting in growth. This phenomena results in the development of land for the use of residential and commercial properties and roads.
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  • What does the tablet say on the Statue of Liberty?

    Q: What does the tablet say on the Statue of Liberty?

    A: The tablet that the Statue of Liberty holds in her left hand is inscribed with the date "JULY IV MDCCLXXVI" – July 4, 1776. The bronze plaque on the statue's pedestal has the text of the poem "The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus engraved upon it.
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  • What is it called when you write with both hands?

    Q: What is it called when you write with both hands?

    A: Ambidexterity refers to being equally adept in using both right and left hands. This ability is the most readily recognized variety of cross-dominance. Only 1 percent of the population is naturally ambidextrous.
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  • What is an atlas used for?

    Q: What is an atlas used for?

    A: An atlas is a book that contains illustrations of maps, charts, plates and tables on any subject, such as geography, history, astronomy and anatomy. The term "atlas" comes from the Greek god Atlas, a Titan said to support the entire Earth on his shoulders. The modern term "atlas" was introduced between 1580 and 1590.
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  • What is the Texas state mammal?

    Q: What is the Texas state mammal?

    A: Texas has three designated state mammals. The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is the state small mammal, the Texas longhorn steer is the state large mammal and the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) is the state flying mammal.
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  • What do AM and PM stand for with regards to time?

    Q: What do AM and PM stand for with regards to time?

    A: In regards to timekeeping, "AM" is an abbreviation of "ante meridiem," and "PM" is short for "post meridiem," according to Dictionary.com. Both of these terms are derived from the Latin phrase "mer diem," which means "midday." These terms are often confused with "antemeridian" and "postmeridian."
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  • Where does the word "democracy" come from?

    Q: Where does the word "democracy" come from?

    A: The word "democracy" comes from the Greek words "demos" and "kratia," which literally mean "people power." The modern word "democracy" emerged in 16th century France.
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  • What was Pythagoras contribution to mathematics?

    Q: What was Pythagoras contribution to mathematics?

    A: Although one of Pythagoras' contributions to mathematics was the Pythagorean Theorem, he also proved other axioms, worked on prime and composite numbers and found an irrational number. Pythagoras was a Greek mathematician who was a student of Thales, another Greek mathematician.
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  • How tall was the Tower of Babel?

    Q: How tall was the Tower of Babel?

    A: Scripture does not explicitly say exactly how tall the Tower of Babel was. According to scripture, the people building the city of Babel wanted to built a tower that reached the heavens.
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  • How many flakes of hay are in a bale?

    Q: How many flakes of hay are in a bale?

    A: A three-string bale of hay normally consists of 17 flakes weighing approximately 8 pounds each. Flakes are the way a bale splits, as detailed by Hay USA, which recommends feeding by weight rather than by flake.
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  • What are some Mount Rushmore facts for kids?

    Q: What are some Mount Rushmore facts for kids?

    A: The Mount Rushmore National Memorial is in the Black Hills of South Dakota in the United States. Doane Robinson was a local historian who thought of the idea in 1923 because he wanted to get more people to come to South Dakota.
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  • Q: How do you use Suntext "First in Math" programs?

    A: Use "First in Math" as a math curriculum supplement specifically by partaking in the program's skill-building games to learn and reinforce math concepts. Family members can also partake in the program by logging in with a Family User ID, available after a student completes a certain number of problems.
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  • Q: How do you apply Havelock's theory of change in nursing?

    A: The six steps to apply Havelock's theory of change in nursing are studying the hospital environment, diagnosing the problem, finding the relevant resources, picking a solution, accepting the plan of action and monitoring the change. Based on Kurt Lewin's theory of change, Havelock's theory accounts for the fluid, rather than linear, nature of affecting change in a relational environment such as a doctor's office or hospital.
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  • Q: What is a problem with different sources of research?

    A: One problem associated with multiple sources of research is credibility. Every source does not have the same level of credibility. Research facilities understand the research process; therefore, people rely on their results. Inexperienced individuals and companies that conduct research don’t use the same methods research institutions use, and their results don’t have the same credibility.
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  • Q: What are some good dictionaries for kids?

    A: “Little Explorers Picture Dictionary,” “Wordsmyth,” “Webster’s New World Children’s Dictionary,” “Thorndike Barnhart Children’s Dictionary” and “The American Heritage Children’s Dictionary” are good dictionaries for children, according to About. Dictionaries for children range from age group and specification, such as a student dictionary.
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  • Q: What are Dex phonebook white pages?

    A: Dex Pages is an Internet version of the traditional phonebook "white pages," and it allows users to easily search for phone numbers by name through an online search. Dex Pages also lets users search Yellow Pages as well as request a variety of services related to telephone books.
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  • What animals live in the Sahara Desert?

    Q: What animals live in the Sahara Desert?

    A: The Sahara Desert is home to approximately 70 species of mammals, 90 species of birds, 100 species of reptiles and several different arthropods, such as scorpions and spiders. The dromedary camel is easily the most popular animal resident of the Sahara. Introduced to the desert around 200 A.D., the dromedary camel is well-adapted to the harsh Saharan climate, having the ability to last for weeks without any food or water.
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  • Who are some famous geneticists?

    Q: Who are some famous geneticists?

    A: Some of the most famous geneticists in the world include Andrew Conrad, Alfred Sturtevant, Dean Hamer, Alfred Kühn, David Suzuki, Gabriel Dover, Craig Venter, Calvin Bridges, George M. Church, Francisco J. Ayala, Francis Collins and Eric Lander.
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  • Q: What are some common terms found in a medical dictionary or encyclopedia?

    A: Some medical terms found in a medical dictionary or encyclopedia include "anuric," "bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy," "chemistry panel," "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease" and "cerebrovascular accident," notes MedicineNet. Medical dictionaries and encyclopedias typically provide information on diseases, tests, symptoms and abbreviations used by health care professionals, according to MedlinePlus.
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  • What does the Calvin cycle use to produce high-energy sugars?

    Q: What does the Calvin cycle use to produce high-energy sugars?

    A: The Calvin cycle uses carbon dioxide, water and adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, to produce high-energy sugars such as glucose, fructose and sucrose. It is one of the core processes of photosynthesis in plants, and the ATP it uses is ultimately produced from sunlight in other parts of the chloroplast. In certain plants, cells with chloroplasts are paired, with one primarily producing ATP, leaving the other for the Calvin cycle.
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