Literary Writing

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Writing a film proposal requires a compelling plot, length of the work and the format, details of the intended audience and a preliminary budget. A film proposal is a comprehensive document that includes the treatment and all of the project details an investor would be interested in.

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  • What are sensory details?

    Q: What are sensory details?

    A: Sensory details are bits of information a writer uses that describe what is being written using the five senses: sight, sound, taste, touch and smell. These words brighten up a story and help the reader feel truly involved instead of simply consuming the writing. Many people describe this writing method as "showing," as opposed to "telling."
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  • How do you write a film proposal?

    Q: How do you write a film proposal?

    A: Writing a film proposal requires a compelling plot, length of the work and the format, details of the intended audience and a preliminary budget. A film proposal is a comprehensive document that includes the treatment and all of the project details an investor would be interested in.
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  • What is an example of a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma?

    Q: What is an example of a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma?

    A: The phrase "a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma" comes from Winston Churchill's radio address broadcast by the BBC on Oct. 1, 1939, in which he discussed his inability to predict what Russia would do during World War II. The phrase has been co-opted by popular culture and used in contexts ranging from movie scripts to scientific papers.
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  • What is a literary symbol?

    Q: What is a literary symbol?

    A: A literary symbol is usually an object that represents an idea that is significantly deeper, although it is sometimes a word, event or deed. One example is a rose, usually taken as a symbol of passion or romantic love.
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  • What does theme mean in literature?

    Q: What does theme mean in literature?

    A: In literature, a theme is a common thread or main idea that is repeated throughout a literary work. The theme of a novel or story is the major message that organizes the entire work. The theme may be expressed overtly, but more often it must be uncovered by reading deeply through the work and analyzing the story's plot, characters and use of literary devices.
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  • What is the climax of a story?

    Q: What is the climax of a story?

    A: The climax of a story is the moment when all events come together for its peak intensity. This is usually located in the third part of a story. The falling action and conclusion follow shortly after a climax due to the decisive nature of a climax. During the climax of the story, all problems are resolved and set the stage for the resulting occurrences to be told in the conclusion.
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  • What does "plot" mean in literature?

    Q: What does "plot" mean in literature?

    A: In literature, plot refers to the main storyline of a literary work. Novels, short stories, memoirs and plays all have plots, but poems and essays typically do not.
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  • What are some examples of hamartia?

    Q: What are some examples of hamartia?

    A: The most famous examples of hamartia include the actions of Hamlet in Shakespeare's play of the same name, the behavior of Oedipus in "Oedipus the King" by Sophocles and the conduct of Victor in "Frankenstein," a novel by Mary Shelley. Hamartia is a literary term meaning "a tragic flaw."
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  • What is a complex character?

    Q: What is a complex character?

    A: A complex character is a character who has a mix of traits that come from both nature and experience, according to fiction writer Elizabeth Moon. Complex characters are more realistic than non-complex characters.
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  • What is the definition of plot structure?

    Q: What is the definition of plot structure?

    A: Plot structure is the sequence of events in a story. It includes the setting, characters, conflict, action and resolution of the story.
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  • What is the difference between a hero and antihero?

    Q: What is the difference between a hero and antihero?

    A: The difference between a hero and an anti-hero lies in the virtues and nobility that a hero possesses and an anti-hero lacks. Though both characters are protagonists and accomplish similar feats, a sense of purpose is missing from the anti-hero.
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  • Why must you have sentence structure variety?

    Q: Why must you have sentence structure variety?

    A: Sentence structure variety makes content more readable and improves its overall quality, states the Purdue University Online Writing Lab. Unvaried sentence structure leads to a sense of monotony and repetition in writing. Varied sentence structure reduces repetition and lends a sense of life and emphasis to writing. Sentence variation also can change the emphasis in a particular sentence.
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  • What is the difference between a main idea and a theme?

    Q: What is the difference between a main idea and a theme?

    A: A main idea is the topic of a paragraph or a segment of text; a theme is a topic that is repeated throughout the full body of a work. A main idea is intended to summarize what a section of text is about. A theme is intended to provide a relevant source of reflection in relation to the text.
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  • What is an example of literary satire?

    Q: What is an example of literary satire?

    A: Satire is a form of literature where the author pokes fun at human vices, weaknesses, and character flaws. The primary goal is shaming the target of satire into reform, with the amusement of the reader being secondary, even unnecessary.
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  • Q: What is an embedded quotation?

    A: An embedded quotation is a quotation that is taken from a piece of work such as a play, poem or novel and is placed within another piece of work such as a paper. Embedded quotations must be shown with quotation marks and should be short and to the point.
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  • Q: Where can you find worksheets to learn similes and metaphors?

    A: Websites that provide worksheets to learn similes and metaphors include K12Reader.com, EnglishLinx.com and SuperTeacherWorksheets.com. K12reader.com is a free site on which users can find many worksheets on similes and metaphors, including a worksheet called "Which is It? Simile or Metaphor?" that compares and contrasts the two figurative language tools.
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  • Q: Where can you find some good sample query letters for literary agents?

    A: Some websites offering good sample query letters for literary agents include WritersDigest.com, AdWeek.com and WeBook.com. AdWeek provides 23 query letters that were actually accepted, and each one is listed by its unique genre.
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  • Q: What is an inciting incident?

    A: An inciting incident is an event that sets the plot of a book, movie or play into motion. This normally occurs after the background and setting have been given.
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  • Q: What is an example of foreshadowing?

    A: An example of foreshadowing occurs in “Romeo and Juliet” when Romeo’s friend Benvolio advises him to find a new love to cure the “rank poison” of an old infatuation, foreshadowing Romeo’s eventual death by poison. Foreshadowing is a technique through which the author hints at later events in a story.
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  • Q: What is a frame narrative?

    A: A frame narrative refers to a type of storytelling in which one or more stories take place within an overall story. Specific types of frame narratives include cyclical frame stories and stories in which the plot of the smaller stories are important to the larger frame story.
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  • Q: What are literary elements?

    A: Literary elements are characteristics common to both oral and written stories. The elements are intrinsic parts of literature, not something an author simply decides to utilize.
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