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What are some examples of plural and singular nouns?

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Quick Answer

Some regular singular and plural nouns are "book" and "books," "house" and "houses," "car" and "cars," and "school" and "schools." Irregular singular and plural nouns include "baby" and "babies," "knife" and "knives," "tomato" and "tomatoes," "man" and "men," "sheep," for which the plural and the singular are the same word, "dress" and "dresses," and "datum" and "data."

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What are some examples of plural and singular nouns?
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Full Answer

Most English nouns are regular, meaning that they form their plurals by adding an "s" to the end of the singular noun. These nouns include "plate" and "plates," "dog" and "dogs," and "cat" and "cats."

Irregular nouns form their plurals in several different ways. Singular nouns ending in "y" often change the "y" to an "i" before adding the letters "es." Examples are the words "lady" and "ladies," "puppy" and "puppies," and "library" and "libraries."

Another group of irregular verbs ending in "f" or "fe" change the "f" to a "v" before adding "s" or "es." Additional examples are "wife" and "wives," "half" and "halves," "leaf" and "leaves," and "shelf" and "shelves."

Some nouns ending in the letter "o" require an "es" at the end to make them plural. The plural of "tomato" is "tomatoes," the plural of "hero" is "heroes" and the plural form of "potato" is "potatoes." Other nouns ending in "o," however, are regular nouns. Words like "piano," "radio" and "solo" only need an "s" added at the end to become plural.

Other nouns form their plurals by changing an internal vowel. "Woman" becomes "women," "foot" becomes "feet," and "tooth" becomes "teeth."

Some nouns are spelled the same in both singular and plural forms. Examples are "deer" and "fish."

Some nouns ending in "s," "sh," "ch," "x" or "z" require an "es" at the end to be plural. Additional examples are "dish" and "dishes," "church" and "churches," "fox" and "foxes," and "buzz" and "buzzes."

Other nouns follow their own rules. "Alumna" becomes "alumni," and "child" becomes "children."

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