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What are some different comparatives and superlatives?

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Quick Answer

Some examples of comparatives include "angrier," "bigger," "finer," "dirtier," "earlier," "later," "more nervous," "simpler," "richer" and "more famous." Some examples of superlatives include "angriest," "biggest," "finest," "dirtiest," "earliest," "latest," "most nervous," "simplest," "richest" and "most famous."

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Full Answer

Comparatives are used to compare the qualities of two things. They are often used with the word "than," such as in the sentence, "My house is larger than yours." Superlatives are used to compare more than two things. An example sentence is, "This is the largest house I've ever been in."

There are different rules for forming comparatives and superlatives, depending on the individual adjective.

For monosyllabic adjectives ending in "e" (such as "wide"), simply add "-r" for comparatives ("wider") and "-st" for superlatives ("widest").

For monosyllabic adjectives ending with one vowel and one consonant (such as "big"), double the consonant and add "-er" for comparatives ("bigger"), and double the consonant and add "-est" for superlatives ("biggest").

For monosyllabic adjectives ending with more than one vowel or more than one consonant ("light"), add "-er" for comparatives ("lighter") and "-est" for superlatives ("lightest").

For adjectives with two syllables ending in "y" ("happy"), change the "y" to an "i" and add "-er" for comparatives ("happier"), and change the "y" to an "i" and add "-est" for superlatives ("happiest").

For adjectives with two or more syllables not ending in "y" ("interesting"), use "more" before the adjective for comparatives ("more interesting") and use "most" before the adjective for superlatives ("most interesting").

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