What Are the Differences Between American English Grammar and British English Grammar?

What Are the Differences Between American English Grammar and British English Grammar?

American English speakers use the present perfect tense a lot more than British English speakers do. Speakers use the present perfect tense to describe a past event that has present consequences. American English speakers use the simple past tense instead. Another difference is that some of the verbs are irregular in American English, but in British English they are regular.

British English speakers usually use 'can' or 'could' with verbs of perception, such as senses. American English speakers use verbs of perception independently. Another difference in grammar is that in British English, it is acceptable for past simple verbs to end in 'ed' or in 't'. However, in American English the ending of 'ed' is normally preferred. When talking about groups of people, British English speakers usually treat collective nouns as plural, while American English speakers refer to them as singular.

In informal situations, American English speakers often shorten some words, such as "gonna." British English speakers don't normally shorten words, even in informal situations. When giving directions, American English speakers usually say "be going to." British English speakers usually use the imperative form and present simple or future forms with "will." British English speakers usually use "have got" when referring to possession or relationships. American English speakers use "have."