Q:

How do you get a copy of your GED certificate in Texas?

A:

Quick Answer

To get a copy of a Texas GED Certificate, visit the Texas Education Agency's website, and input your date of birth, Social Security number and candidate ID. This service provides a free verification letter or a printable file including test scores and a certificate for $5, as of September 2014.

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How do you get a copy of your GED certificate in Texas?
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Full Answer

  1. Go to the certificate search website

    The secure Texas Education Agency GED certificate search provides instant access to a transcript file. Be sure to determine if there is a secure connection before giving the site your personal information.

  2. Input your birth date

    The certificate search requires a date of birth with two digits for a month, two digits for a day and four digits for a year. The birthdate should match the one you gave while taking the GED test.

  3. Enter your Social Security number or file ID

    The Social Security number is nine digits with no hyphens. Students that requested a file number can use that number instead. If you cannot find your file ID number, send an email with your full name and birthdate to ged@tea.state.tx.us.

  4. Input your candidate ID

    The candidate ID, given to you by the GED Testing Service, also goes into the GED search. If you cannot find this number, contact the GEDTS with toll-free numbers, an email address or live chat.

  5. Choose your options

    A verification letter stating you passed the GED is free. By selecting the $5 option, you receive a printable file of test scores, a certificate of high school equivalency and a diploma suitable for framing.

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