Q:

What are some of the most common phrases in the English language?

A:

Quick Answer

"Grab a bite," "twenty-four seven," "to wolf something down," "barking up the wrong tree" and "the best thing since slice bread" are some common phrases in the English language. Talk English, World English and Smart Words explain the meaning of each phrase. The first two websites include example sentences.

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What are some of the most common phrases in the English language?
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Full Answer

The phrase "grab a bite" means to get something to eat, with the term "bite" meaning food. Here is an example sentence from Talk English: "If you didn't have lunch yet, let's grab a bite to eat." The phrase "twenty-four seven" refers to twenty-four hours in a day and seven days in a week. People use the phrase to imply that something is constant, always available or happening every minute of the day or night. The following is a sentence using the phrase: "You better be careful because I'm going to be watching you twenty-four seven."

The phrase "to wolf something down" means to eat something quickly. The following is a sentence World English uses as an example: "I wolfed down that sandwich so quickly." This refers to how quickly wolves eat their food for fear that another wolf will eat it first.

"Barking up the wrong tree" and "the best thing since sliced bread" are on the Smart Words website. The first phrase means someone is looking in the wrong place or accusing the wrong person. The second phrase implies something is a good invention or innovation.

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