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What are some common idioms and phrases?

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Quick Answer

“Piece of cake,” “costs an arm and a leg,” “hit the books,” “let the cat out of the bag” and “you can’t judge a book by its cover” are some common idioms and phrases. An idiom is a phrase that has different cultural meaning as opposed to the literal meaning of its composite words. “Ace in the hole,” “Achilles’ heel,” “at the drop of a hat,” “bite the bullet” and “kick the bucket” are also idioms.

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Full Answer

“Piece of cake” is used to indicate that something was or is very easy to accomplish. “Installing the new software on the computer was a piece of cake” is an example of it in use. “Costs an arm and a leg” means that something is very expensive; for example, “The newly released motorcycle costs an arm and a leg.”

“Let the cat out of the bag” means to reveal a secret. “You can’t judge a book by its cover” means that one cannot judge or understand a thing based on its external appearances. “Ace in the hole” means a secret strength or advantage that is not revealed. “Achilles’ heel” is used to indicate a critical weakness in spite of extraordinary strength. “At the drop of a hat” means to do something instantly or without any hesitation.

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