Q:

What are some advantages of making copies of a rough draft before editing?

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Quick Answer

The advantage of writing and making copies of a rough draft before editing is that it allows the writer to put down ideas and flesh out a story without reservation. Focusing on the bigger picture during the drafting session helps the writer develop the story's crucial elements, such as the plot, climax and ending. Editing a rough draft is then made easier because the backbone of the story is already in place.

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Full Answer

Author Martha Alderson suggests writing several rough drafts until the end is written. Rough drafts are opportunities to fail, because numerous drafts can be written without going through a tedious editing process.

Writing rough drafts is advantageous because it eases the stress of procrastination and perfectionism. Instead of holding themselves to the expectation of composing quality products and staring at their computer screens anxious for ideas to flow, writers can transition into the process by letting go and simply writing rough drafts. The revisions that follow may then be increasingly easier. Editing, on the other hand, can prevent people from developing their stories, as they may be too focused on the minute details and creating perfect papers than simply putting down their ideas.

Rough drafts allow for exploration and discovery. As thoughts develop, new ideas may shine through that the writer didn't originally intend. Editing leads to worry about grammar, spelling and organization, which are secondary elements to a compelling work. When writers create rough drafts first, they give themselves permission to be free with their stories, which potentially leads to better overall products.

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