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What are some adjectives that describe personal qualities?

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There are some adjectives describing personal qualities that people often use in daily life, such as "calm," "impatient," "arrogant" and "diligent." In writing context, they often use words such as "impetuous," "aggressive," "courageous" and "determined." Adjectives such as "convivial" and "nonchalant" are some less common words to describe a person.

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Personal qualities are an individual’s characteristics that make up his personality. Personal qualities relate to an individual’s tendencies to behave, think and react in a particular way, and they become clear when he speaks, acts and interacts with others.

There are a variety of adjectives that can describe personal qualities. Adjectives can refer to either one or all of an individual’s characteristics, abilities or attitudes. For instance, people use "calm" to characterize someone who does not get agitated or upset easily, while "impatient," which means being quickly irritated or provoked, can be seen as a characteristic or capacity for organization. An example for adjectives that refer to attitudes is "determined." The word indicates that an individual is displaying resolve or is resolute.

Some adjectives may be considered positive, such as "diligent," or negative, such as "arrogant." People use "diligent" to compliment someone who is hard-working and persistent in doing anything. They may also use similar adjectives such as "aggressive" or "industrious." On the other hand, "arrogant" is a negative adjective that means "cocky" or "insolently proud."

Not all of these words appear frequently in daily conversation. "Convivial" is an example of an uncommon adjective to describe a friendly person. Instead, people often say that the person is "friendly" or "sociable." "Nonchalant," which means "coolly unconcerned," is another uncommon word. Describing someone as nonchalant is saying that she lacks warmth and enthusiasm.

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