Q:

What is workplace safety?

A:

Quick Answer

Workplace safety is an area of law concerned with preventing workplace-related injuries and illnesses, according to the Legal Information Institute at Cornell University Law School. Three Department of Labor agencies are tasked with enforcing workplace safety and health laws, according to the United States Department of Labor.

Continue Reading
What is workplace safety?
Credit: TonyLomas iStock / Getty Images Plus Getty Images

Full Answer

The three government agencies that administer and enforce workplace safety laws are the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Mine Safety and Health Administration, and the Wage and Hour Division, as stated by the U.S. Department of Labor. All private employers engaged in interstate commerce are subject to the regulations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which is the main workplace safety statute, according to the Legal Information Institute. The Act requires that employers provide a generally safe working environment free from serious, obvious hazards.

The Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 protects U.S. mine workers and is enforced by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. This act requires mine operators to notify the administration immediately in the event of hoisting equipment damage, accidental ignition of gas or dust, or death of a miner. The Wage and Hour Division specifies minimum employment ages, as well as schedule and job-type restrictions to protect the well-being of young workers.

Learn more about Business Resources

Related Questions

Explore