Q:

What are some U.S. laws regarding workers' compensation?

A:

Quick Answer

The Federal Employment Compensation Act provides workers' compensation benefits for federal employees who are not members of the military, according to the Legal Information Institute. Each state has its own workers' compensation laws for employees of private businesses, reports the National Federation of Independent Business.

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Full Answer

In addition to the Federal Employment Compensation Act, some workers are also covered by the Black Lung Benefits Act or the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, states the Legal Information Institute. The Black Lung Benefits Act provides compensation for miners who have black lung, or pneumoconiosis. Under the act, liable mine operators are required to pay disability payments to miners with the disease. The Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act covers certain employees of private employers in the maritime industry.

Workers' compensation laws vary significantly from state to state. Most states require employers to carry some sort of workers' compensation insurance, but the requirements may vary based on the company's annual payroll or the number of people employed, according to the National Federation of Independent Business. For example, Alaska requires all employers with one or more employees to purchase workers' compensation insurance. In Kansas, employers do not have to carry workers' compensation insurance unless their gross annual payroll exceeds $20,000.

Coverage requirements may also vary by industry, reports the National Federation of Independent Business. In Missouri, for example, construction companies with one or more employees must carry workers' compensation insurance, but employers in other industries do not have to provide workers' compensation coverage unless they have five or more employees.

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