Q:

When does tax season start?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the IRS, the 2015 tax season for individuals began on Jan. 16, 2015. The IRS will begin accepting and processing all tax returns on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015.

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When does tax season start?
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Full Answer

Taxpayers are able to use the IRS' Free File system starting on Jan. 16th and will be able to use e-file or file paper tax returns starting Jan. 20th. While the IRS works year-round on improving its tax processing systems, the bulk of the work takes place during the start of fall. The IRS expects to handle about 150 million individual income tax returns this year. Taxpayers have until April 15, 2015 to file their returns and pay any taxes.

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