Q:

How much do actors get paid?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median hourly wage for actors as of May 2012 was $20.26. The top 10 percent earned more than $90 per hour, while the lowest 10 percent made less than $8.92 hourly.

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How much do actors get paid?
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Full Answer

While acting does not require a college education, many actors enroll in performing arts programs and acting conservatories. Actors are often under pressure to find and retain work. Once employed they often work long or irregular hours. In the United States, the demand for actors between 2012 and 2022 is expected to grow 4 percent, slower when compared to averages of other occupations.

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