Taxes

A:

While there are some ways to deduct medical expenses from federal taxes, the rules for who and what qualifies for these deductions are strict and may be a bit confusing to some taxpayers. For example, there is a rule stating that taxpayers and the spouses of taxpayers who are 65 years and older may deduct medical expenses that are more than 7.5 percent of the taxpayer's gross income so long as those expenses were not reimbursed. This rule only applies during the period of Jan. 1, 2013 through Dec. 31, 2016, further narrowing the field of which senior citizen taxpayers qualify to claim medical expenses on a tax return.

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  • How much do you have to make to file a 1099?

    Q: How much do you have to make to file a 1099?

    A: As of 2014, if you earn $600 or more working as an independent contractor for one company, you need to file a 1099 form to the Internal Revenue Service. The company should send you a 1099-MISC form by January 31 of the following year.
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  • Which states have the lowest income taxes?

    Q: Which states have the lowest income taxes?

    A: Almost all Americans are required to pay state income tax in addition to the federal income tax. These tax rates may change from year to year, with some states raising or lowering their tax rates. In 2014, some states, such as Texas and Alaska, required no state income tax.
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  • Are dental implants tax deductible?

    Q: Are dental implants tax deductible?

    A: The Internal Revenue Service states that the amount paid for dental implants can be reported as a medical expense on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. Not all taxpayers benefit from these expenses, as medical expenses have to exceed a percentage of income before they become deductible.
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  • Which U.S. state has a belt buckle tax?

    Q: Which U.S. state has a belt buckle tax?

    A: Texas has a seemingly arbitrary law on the books that charges sales tax for some clothing items, such as belt buckles, but not for others, such as the belts themselves. This tax system applies to other things, such as rain boots, which are taxable, but not cowboy boots, which are exempt.
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  • How do you find a company's tax ID number?

    Q: How do you find a company's tax ID number?

    A: Company tax identification numbers are procured from the Internal Revenue Service, public company documents or fee-based resources such as Lexis or Westlaw. The IRS issues, stores and maintains all employer tax identification numbers in the United States. However, the IRS requires authorization from the underlying company to receive the tax ID number.
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  • What can I write off on my taxes as an independent contractor?

    Q: What can I write off on my taxes as an independent contractor?

    A: TurboTax reports that independent contractors can deduct half of the self-employment tax, health insurance premiums, office expenses, retirement plan contributions and business travel expenses. Independent contractors can also deduct the mileage accumulated on a personal vehicle when driving for business-related purposes. About.com notes that business equipment, employee benefits and wages, advertising costs, professional dues, professional services and repair costs can also be tax deductions for independent contractors.
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  • What is the "jock tax"?

    Q: What is the "jock tax"?

    A: The "jock tax" refers to a type of income tax that is imposed by states or cities on athletes that make money while playing inside of a specific state or city. While the tax can also be applied to other businesses, it has been often used to charge visiting athletes since it is easier to track when and where they made their money.
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  • Can you deduct healthcare costs from your taxes?

    Q: Can you deduct healthcare costs from your taxes?

    A: While there are some ways to deduct medical expenses from federal taxes, the rules for who and what qualifies for these deductions are strict and may be a bit confusing to some taxpayers. For example, there is a rule stating that taxpayers and the spouses of taxpayers who are 65 years and older may deduct medical expenses that are more than 7.5 percent of the taxpayer's gross income so long as those expenses were not reimbursed. This rule only applies during the period of Jan. 1, 2013 through Dec. 31, 2016, further narrowing the field of which senior citizen taxpayers qualify to claim medical expenses on a tax return.
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  • What is estate tax?

    Q: What is estate tax?

    A: Estate tax is a federal or state tax on property that a person owns at death and is transferred to another person or entity through a will or through the state laws that govern the assets of people who die without a will, called intestacy laws. Everything a person owns at death, including cash, stock, real estate, insurance proceeds and business interests, comprises the person's estate.
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  • When was a former IRS Commissioner convicted of tax evasion?

    Q: When was a former IRS Commissioner convicted of tax evasion?

    A: In 1952, former IRS commissioner Joseph Nunan got in trouble for tax evasion. In an odd twist, his problems were not due to corruption or hypocrisy but a simple misunderstanding over $2,000. He won a bet on a presidential election and forgot to claim the winnings on his tax return.
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  • What is fat tax?

    Q: What is fat tax?

    A: As of 2014, a fat tax is a proposed tax on unhealthy foods to discourage consumers from buying them. This tax, also known as the Twinkie tax, was largely developed by Kelly Brownell, a psychology professor at Yale University, who discussed the idea in the New York Times in 1994.
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  • What is France's "Google tax"?

    Q: What is France's "Google tax"?

    A: France's so-called "Google tax" isn't aimed at the search-engine company but rather at the international tech industry as a whole. The tax allows the French government to levy taxes on Internet companies that operate in France like traditional businesses.
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  • What country had a beard tax?

    Q: What country had a beard tax?

    A: Though the law is no longer in place, in the 1700s Russia had a federal tax on people with beards. The motivation for this strange revenue source stemmed from the country's then-ruler, Peter the Great, and his crusade against facial hair.
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  • What is taxation?

    Q: What is taxation?

    A: Taxation is when governments require citizens to pay a certain amount of money to help fund public institutions. Taxes are used to pay for things like public education, welfare programs, transportation infrastructure, defense funds and libraries.
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  • What is the purpose of an audit?

    Q: What is the purpose of an audit?

    A: An audit is a process that the Internal Revenue Service uses to check that the numbers of an account correspond with the tax return. While the IRS chooses to audit those with suspicious activity on their returns, there are also audits on a random sample of people and companies.
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  • How many years can you file back taxes?

    Q: How many years can you file back taxes?

    A: Back taxes can be filed for up to 10 years after the tax year in which the resident neglected to file income taxes, according to ETaxes.com. After 10 years, the statute of limitations runs out for the Internal Revenue Service to collect back taxes in most states. In a few states, the statute of limitations never runs out, meaning back taxes can be filed at any point in the resident's life.
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  • How long should you keep tax records?

    Q: How long should you keep tax records?

    A: According to the Internal Revenue Service, how long people should keep their tax records depends on the type and purpose of the documentation, but IRS and Forbes magazine guidelines say that keeping records three to six years from the filing date or due date, whichever is later, covers many eventualities. The IRS recommends keeping tax records at least until the statue of limitations related to a certain record expires.
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  • What is a luxury tax?

    Q: What is a luxury tax?

    A: A luxury tax is essentially a tax placed on any goods or services the United States government as well as many state governments deem as non-essential. Such a tax is aimed at only those who are wealthy enough to afford luxury items. Despite the fact that many items formerly considered luxury goods no longer are viewed that way, the term persists.
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  • How do you get an EIN number?

    Q: How do you get an EIN number?

    A: Contact the Internal Revenue Service to apply for an Employee Identification Number (EIN). Apply online, by mail, fax or phone. Business owners who apply over the phone should be prepared to answer the same questions included on the IRS Form SS-4, Application for an Employer Identification Number.
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  • Why are Swiss bank accounts so special?

    Q: Why are Swiss bank accounts so special?

    A: Switzerland's strict privacy laws make it difficult to see who holds an account there, making Swiss bank accounts ideal for those who are trying to hide money. In other words, Switzerland makes an excellent tax shelter for those who want to keep their money in a bank but don't want to pay taxes for it.
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  • What are some examples of indirect tax?

    Q: What are some examples of indirect tax?

    A: One example of an indirect tax is sales tax, which is imposed entirely on the buyer rather than both on the seller and the buyer. Indirect taxes are taken from stakeholders that are generally not thought to be entirely responsible for the amount being taxed.
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