Health Insurance

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There are multiple tiers of low income classifications under the Medicare system, all of which use the federal poverty level as a base line. At the first tier, an individual or couple's assets and income must fall under 100 percent of the federal poverty level.

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  • What is the Medicaid program?

    Q: What is the Medicaid program?

    A: Medicaid is a governmental program that provides medical and health-related services for specific groups of people in the United States who meet certain criteria. Many times this care is provided at no cost to individuals and families, serving U.S. citizens with low incomes and few resources.
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  • Are you eligible for Medicare if you're under the age of 65?

    Q: Are you eligible for Medicare if you're under the age of 65?

    A: Individuals who are disabled or who have end-stage renal failure may qualify for Medicare benefits even if they are younger than 65, according to Medicare. Otherwise, individuals are not eligible for Medicare until age 65.
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  • Does Medicare cover dental surgery?

    Q: Does Medicare cover dental surgery?

    A: Medicare insurance plans do not provide coverage for most dental care procedures, according to CMS.gov. This includes preventative care, fillings, extractions, surgeries and other dental procedures and supplies.
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  • Does Medicaid cover eye exams?

    Q: Does Medicaid cover eye exams?

    A: Medicaid typically provides services that cover vision benefits, including eye exams in most states. The frequency individuals may receive an eye exam varies from state to state. Children under 21 can receive eye exams, eyeglass frames and lenses under a Medicaid program.
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  • Is Medicare Part B mandatory?

    Q: Is Medicare Part B mandatory?

    A: Medicare Part B coverage is not mandatory. An individual can go outside of the plan network for Part B services and receive a reimbursement from Medicare when Medicare is the primary payer.
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  • Is the HIPAA law different in each state?

    Q: Is the HIPAA law different in each state?

    A: HIPPA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is a federal law that is the same regardless of state. Each state has, however, enacted its own privacy acts that may supersede HIPPA under certain conditions.
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  • What are the different types of Medicaid plans?

    Q: What are the different types of Medicaid plans?

    A: The types of Medicaid programs available to patients vary from state to state, but generally fall into two categories. Of these, community Medicaid is coverage for people who have little to know medical insurance from other sources, while Medicaid nursing home coverage is specifically for costs associated with senior living.
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  • What is the HIPAA Privacy Act?

    Q: What is the HIPAA Privacy Act?

    A: The Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulates the use and disclosure of individually identifiable health information. Although President Clinton signed HIPAA into law in 1996, the Privacy Rule did not become effective until April 14, 2003.
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  • What is considered "low income" to Medicare?

    Q: What is considered "low income" to Medicare?

    A: There are multiple tiers of low income classifications under the Medicare system, all of which use the federal poverty level as a base line. At the first tier, an individual or couple's assets and income must fall under 100 percent of the federal poverty level.
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  • What is the opposite of risk averse?

    Q: What is the opposite of risk averse?

    A: In the realm of investments, the generally accepted opposite of risk adverse is risk taker or risk lover. A risk taker is an individual willing to a greater risk in investing in hopes of obtaining a higher, albeit less likely, return on that investment.
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  • Q: Can you buy short-term health care insurance?

    A: Many of the major insurance companies, such as Humana, United Healthcare Services, and Blue Cross and Blue Shield, offer short-term health care insurance plans, according to Bloomberg Business. However, these plans do not offer the same protections as policies sold under the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, as of 2015.
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  • Q: What percentage of psychiatrist fees does Medicare cover?

    A: Medicare covers 80 percent of psychiatrist fees meeting its criteria, leaving patients with a 20 percent copay. Medicare provides nearly full coverage for fees associating with outpatient mental health services, including office visits with practitioners and even some therapies, such as art and dance therapy. Medicare offers coverage for these services, provided patients select practitioners participating in Medicare's plan, called in-network providers, according to Medicare Interactive.com.
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  • Q: How do you get Medicare forms online?

    A: Links to the most commonly used Medicare forms are available online at Medicare.gov, the U.S. government site for Medicare. A searchable database of many Medicare forms is available at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services website.
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  • Q: How can you find providers that accept AARP insurance?

    A: Retirees enrolled in AARP health insurance can visit the AARP Medicare Plans official site to search by location for providers who accept their insurance plans. AARP endorses UnitedHealthcare, which offers Medicaid Advantage plans, Medicaid Supplement Insurance plans and AARP MedicareRx plans, notes the AARP Medical Plans site.
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  • Q: What are some notable moments in the history of the Medicare program?

    A: Several notable changes have expanded Medicare offerings since the program began in 1965, including the addition of private insurance and a prescription drug benefit, according to the American Association of Retired Persons. Medicare, originally designed to provide health insurance to people age 65 and older, experienced its first major change in 1972 when the program was extended to cover younger individuals with end-stage renal disease or long-term disabilities.
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  • Q: When can you enroll in the Medicare Advantage Program?

    A: As of 2015, the open enrollment period for the Medicare Advantage Program is between October 15 and December 7 every year, according to Medicare. During this time, a Medicare subscriber can switch their Medicare Advantage Plan, switch between Medicare and an Advantage Plan, and add or drop a drug plan.
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  • Q: Does Medicare cover chiropractic services?

    A: Medicare Part B covers medically-necessary chiropractic services. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines state the spinal manipulation must be performed by a qualified provider to correct a subluxation. X-rays, massage therapy and other services or tests must be paid separately.
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  • Q: How do you compare the costs, benefits and features of FEHB plans?

    A: Compare the costs, benefits and features of Federal Employees Health Benefits Program plans by studying the plan brochures available from the OPM.gov website or your employer's human resources office, advises Benefits.gov. The health plans format and organize the brochures uniformly for easy comparison.
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  • Q: What happens to unclaimed funds in a health savings account?

    A: The Internal Revenue Service treats a Health Savings Account like a personal savings account, which means that unused funds remain in the account until spent on qualified expenses, explains the IRS. If a taxpayer leaves a HSA dormant for too long, his state's unclaimed property department may claim it. For example, the State of Oregon Unclaimed Property Section can reclaim a dormant HSA after three years of inactivity, but other states may have different thresholds.
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  • Q: How do you make a complaint about a health professional or hospital?

    A: File a complaint against a health professional with a supervising physician or through your state's medical society or licensing board, recommends the American Medical Association. Consult the AMA Code of Medical Ethics to learn if the health professional's conduct was unethical or unprofessional.
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  • Q: What is Gateway Health Insurance?

    A: The Gateway Health Plan is a type of managed care plan under Medicaid, available to eligible participants, notes the Gateway Health website. Participants are eligible for either Medicare or Medicaid.
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