Credit & Lending

A:

Experian considers a credit score higher than 700 as indicative of good credit management. Typical credit scores range between 600 and 750, but the scale runs from 300 to 850.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • How do you write a letter for explanation of a bankruptcy?

    Q: How do you write a letter for explanation of a bankruptcy?

    A: The purpose of a letter of explanation of a bankruptcy is to explain to a potential lender the extenuating circumstances for an unfavorable credit history. These can include loss of a job, medical problems, family member deaths and other circumstances that are unlikely to reoccur. A combination of these credible excuses sometimes help reduce the waiting period for obtaining a new mortgage after bankruptcy or foreclosure, according to Innman News.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a good credit score from Experian?

    Q: What is a good credit score from Experian?

    A: According to Experian, a good credit score is a score above 700. This suggests to a lender that there is a history of good credit management. Experian states that most credit scores are between 600 to 750.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How long does a creditor have to collect a debt?

    Q: How long does a creditor have to collect a debt?

    A: The average statute of limitations, or the number of years a debtor has to seek payment or sue, is three to six years, according to the Federal Trade Commission. The exact time frame varies by state and the type of debt under collection.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can I give my house back to the bank?

    Q: Can I give my house back to the bank?

    A: According to the Federal Trade Commission, a person facing foreclosure can give his house back to the bank with a deed in lieu of foreclosure. In exchange for signing over the deed to the home, the bank forgives the debt owed on the home.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do you ask for financial help?

    Q: How do you ask for financial help?

    A: Asking friends or family for financial help requires being honest about one's financial situation, including the possibility of and timetable for paying money back. It also involves treating the request as a business transaction, keeping lines of communication open and showing gratitude for any loan or gift received.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does adverse credit mean?

    Q: What does adverse credit mean?

    A: According to FinAid, adverse credit is defined as having any debt paid over 90 days late, or having a Title IV debt within the past five years that has been subjected to default, foreclosure, bankruptcy discharge, repossession, tax lien, write-off or wage garnishment. While this designation does not otherwise involve the credit score, it does have an effect on a person's ability to get a loan or other financing.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do I give back a financed car?

    Q: How do I give back a financed car?

    A: According to Nolo, a legal advice website, you can simply call the dealer and return a financed car, but the lender is under no obligation to release you from the debt owed. The lender may sell the car, but you may still be found liable for the difference between the price the lender gets from reselling the car and the price you agreed to pay.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is pre-approval?

    Q: What is pre-approval?

    A: Pre-approval means a lender is ready to make a customer a loan or extend some other type of credit based on information the customer provided or that the lender retrieved from a credit reporting agency. Pre-approval is not usually a guaranteed approval; instead, it is an initial creditworthiness evaluation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How long does it take to recover from bankruptcy?

    Q: How long does it take to recover from bankruptcy?

    A: The exact amount of time it takes for someone to recover depends on the type of bankruptcy filed, according to Experian. A chapter 7 bankruptcy stays on one's credit report for 10 years, while a chapter 13 bankruptcy stays for seven years. As time goes on, the damage to someone's credit score from the bankruptcy lessens.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the factors that go into your credit score calculation?

    Q: What are the factors that go into your credit score calculation?

    A: The factors that go into calculating a FICO credit score, the system used by most banks and other businesses that deal in credit, include payment history, amount of debt, length of credit history, types of credit and amount of inquiries. Special circumstances such as bankruptcy or a limited credit history also impact credit scores.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How should you write a commitment letter?

    Q: How should you write a commitment letter?

    A: A commitment letter is written in a clear, concise and diplomatic tone. All essential information must be reviewed prior to writing. The letter outlines all previously agreed terms between the parties involved.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a renter credit check?

    Q: What is a renter credit check?

    A: A renter credit check is when a landlord checks a person's credit report and score to determine if he should rent a property to the potential tenant. A renter credit check is often the only way a landlord can sort reliable tenants from unreliable tenants.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How does a voluntary repo affect my credit?

    Q: How does a voluntary repo affect my credit?

    A: Submitting to voluntary repossession can reduce the amount of money that is ultimately charged to you and might therefore make restoring your credit a little easier. A voluntary repossession is much like an involuntary repossession in that the unpaid balance of the debt is still charged to you along with any costs associated with repossessing the property but, according to the Federal Trade Commission, it might be cheaper.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do credit card companies investigate fraud?

    Q: How do credit card companies investigate fraud?

    A: Credit card companies investigate fraud by verifying all information associated with the account, speaking to the business entity where the money was spent and working with law enforcement to find the credit card thief. This process can take a long period of time and may be drawn out for several months depending on the amount of money that was stolen and the circumstances surrounding the account before the credit card was stolen.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a pending charge?

    Q: What is a pending charge?

    A: A pending charge on a bank account, credit card or debit card is one that has not fully been applied to the account yet, according to Wells Fargo. A pending charge may also be referred to as a pending transaction.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is "do it yourself credit repair"?

    Q: What is "do it yourself credit repair"?

    A: According to the Federal Trade Commission, most credit repair businesses are scams, and as such they advocate consumers take a "do-it-yourself" approach to credit repair by working with creditors to remove inaccurate information, and by setting up and sticking to a payment schedule to pay off debts that are legitimately owed. There are no easy fixes when it comes to repairing credit, and in particular, only time can remove accurate negative reports, but taking a personal, and active roll in the repair process will save consumers money and reduce frustrations in the long run.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What happens if my house is repossessed?

    Q: What happens if my house is repossessed?

    A: If a house is repossessed by the mortgage company, it is usually sold through an auction or a real estate agent. Depending on both the mortgage company and the state, the former owner may have the opportunity to redeem the property. If the home sells for less value than the outstanding mortgage, the former owner may be sued by the lender for the difference or have the debt forgiven.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do I get my name off of a joint mortgage?

    Q: How do I get my name off of a joint mortgage?

    A: A mortgage is a legally binding contract, so it is not possible to remove a name from the loan documents until the mortgage has been paid in full. According to the San Francisco Gate Home Guides, the mortgage loan can be refinanced in the name of the person who wishes to keep ownership of the home, or the property can be sold to settle the debt.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is 644 a good credit score?

    Q: Is 644 a good credit score?

    A: According to Credit.org, a credit score of 644 is not considered a good credit score. A score that ranges from 620 to 680 is categorized as an acceptable credit score.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the advantages of a bank loan?

    Q: What are the advantages of a bank loan?

    A: According to Chron, the major advantages of a bank loan are stability and autonomy if the borrower is a small business. This source explains that banks lend money without taking ownership in the enterprise for which the loan is being used, so the borrower retains total autonomy as long as the money is paid back in time.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the highest credit score you can get?

    Q: What is the highest credit score you can get?

    A: As of 2014, a perfect score on the FICO credit scoring model is 850. However, a perfect score is rare. A 2013 Bankrate article pointed out that a long-time mortgage banker had never seen a FICO score higher than 834.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: