Credit & Lending

A:

HARP stands for the Home Affordable Refinance Program. A HARP loan provides a refinancing option intended for people who are able to stay current on mortgage payments but are in a financially adverse situation with their mortgage as a whole and owe the current value of their home or more.

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  • How do I give back a financed car?

    Q: How do I give back a financed car?

    A: According to Nolo, a legal advice website, you can simply call the dealer and return a financed car, but the lender is under no obligation to release you from the debt owed. The lender may sell the car, but you may still be found liable for the difference between the price the lender gets from reselling the car and the price you agreed to pay.
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  • What is the difference between credit and debit?

    Q: What is the difference between credit and debit?

    A: The difference between credit and debit, relating to a bank card, is that credit allows a purchase without immediate funds based on the customer's trusted and proven ability to pay, while debit is an actual debt recorded in an account, as defined by Dictionary. In bookkeeping and accounting, a credit is a payment to an account, and a debit is a debt on an account, according to Bookkeeping Basics.
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  • What does adverse credit mean?

    Q: What does adverse credit mean?

    A: According to FinAid, adverse credit is defined as having any debt paid over 90 days late, or having a Title IV debt within the past five years that has been subjected to default, foreclosure, bankruptcy discharge, repossession, tax lien, write-off or wage garnishment. While this designation does not otherwise involve the credit score, it does have an effect on a person's ability to get a loan or other financing.
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  • Where can I get help for finding free grants at no cost to me?

    Q: Where can I get help for finding free grants at no cost to me?

    A: According to USA.gov, grants that come at no cost to the applicant can be applied for and potentially received from the federal government, from states and from local communities. The federal government typically provides funds to local agencies that then distribute the grants for particular purposes.
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  • What is a pending charge?

    Q: What is a pending charge?

    A: A pending charge on a bank account, credit card or debit card is one that has not fully been applied to the account yet, according to Wells Fargo. A pending charge may also be referred to as a pending transaction.
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  • Where can you find lists of free student scholarships?

    Q: Where can you find lists of free student scholarships?

    A: There are many online lists of free student scholarships, including ones maintained by the Consumer Fraud Reporting Bureau, the list of free minority scholarships at Black Excel and the lists hosted on Scholarship Experts. These sites maintain different lists of scholarships that are organized by their accessibility and by the ways in which they apply and do not apply to bodies of students, according to the websites themselves.
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  • How can you improve a low credit score?

    Q: How can you improve a low credit score?

    A: Improve a low credit score by analyzing your credit report and disputing any errors, paying off debts, balancing existing cards and keeping up with current payments, states About.com. Avoid applying for new credit cards, cancelling old cards or reaching your credit limit.
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  • What is a GMAC auto loan?

    Q: What is a GMAC auto loan?

    A: A GMAC auto loan is a consumer debt instrument that is issued to help finance the purchase of an automobile. Wikipedia explains that In 2010, GMAC changed its name to Ally Financial, but it continued to offer vehicle financing to qualified customers.
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  • How long does it take to recover from bankruptcy?

    Q: How long does it take to recover from bankruptcy?

    A: The exact amount of time it takes for someone to recover depends on the type of bankruptcy filed, according to Experian. A chapter 7 bankruptcy stays on one's credit report for 10 years, while a chapter 13 bankruptcy stays for seven years. As time goes on, the damage to someone's credit score from the bankruptcy lessens.
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  • What is the definition of annual premium?

    Q: What is the definition of annual premium?

    A: An annual premium is defined as the amount that someone is required to pay each year in order to keep his or her insurance policy active. If the insured person does not pay the premium amount by the policy's specified due date, the policy is cancelled. Some insurance companies offer a grace period after the due date, and if the premium is paid in this time frame, the policy is reinstated.
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  • What percentage of parents pay for college?

    Q: What percentage of parents pay for college?

    A: The percentage of parents who pay at least a portion of their children's college costs is between 22 and 35 percent. The rate varies depending on the components of cost and payment figured into the calculation.
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  • How do you check your credit score?

    Q: How do you check your credit score?

    A: Because lenders assess your credit score to determine how much of a financial risk you are, it is vital to stay on top of your credit score and check your credit reports yearly. You simply need a computer with Internet access and a credit card to check your score. Websites such as Annual Credit Report allow you to review your credit report and purchase your credit score.
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  • How long before a check becomes void?

    Q: How long before a check becomes void?

    A: According to RealSimple, banks are not required to honor personal checks that are more than six months old. Checks older than six months are considered "stale dated," and it is up to the bank whether or not to honor them.
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  • Can you put a down payment for a house on a credit card?

    Q: Can you put a down payment for a house on a credit card?

    A: BankRate states that most mortgage lenders require a cash down payment of 5 percent, 10 percent or 20 percent of the price of the home. The Federal Housing Administration approves loans of 3.5 percent. The use of a credit card to pay the down payment is not allowed.
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  • How does a voluntary repo affect my credit?

    Q: How does a voluntary repo affect my credit?

    A: Submitting to voluntary repossession can reduce the amount of money that is ultimately charged to you and might therefore make restoring your credit a little easier. A voluntary repossession is much like an involuntary repossession in that the unpaid balance of the debt is still charged to you along with any costs associated with repossessing the property but, according to the Federal Trade Commission, it might be cheaper.
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  • What are the factors that go into your credit score calculation?

    Q: What are the factors that go into your credit score calculation?

    A: The factors that go into calculating a FICO credit score, the system used by most banks and other businesses that deal in credit, include payment history, amount of debt, length of credit history, types of credit and amount of inquiries. Special circumstances such as bankruptcy or a limited credit history also impact credit scores.
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  • What is the mortgage underwriting process?

    Q: What is the mortgage underwriting process?

    A: The mortgage underwriting process is the final, extensive review phase of a home loan application before a lender approves and funds a mortgage. The homeowner typically has little to no direct contact with underwriters as their reviews are performed behind the scenes.
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  • Can I buy a money order with a credit card?

    Q: Can I buy a money order with a credit card?

    A: As a general rule, a money order cannot be purchased with a credit card, according to Fox Business News.
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  • How do you ask for financial help?

    Q: How do you ask for financial help?

    A: Asking friends or family for financial help requires being honest about one's financial situation, including the possibility of and timetable for paying money back. It also involves treating the request as a business transaction, keeping lines of communication open and showing gratitude for any loan or gift received.
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  • How long does eviction stay on a credit report?

    Q: How long does eviction stay on a credit report?

    A: Financial Scams notes that an eviction can stay on a credit report for up to seven years. Typically the landlord does not send the information to the credit bureaus. When a landlord evicts a tenant through court action, the eviction appears on a credit report as a public record.
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  • Can I give my house back to the bank?

    Q: Can I give my house back to the bank?

    A: According to the Federal Trade Commission, a person facing foreclosure can give his house back to the bank with a deed in lieu of foreclosure. In exchange for signing over the deed to the home, the bank forgives the debt owed on the home.
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