When is it appropriate to write a "thank you" letter to your boss?


Quick Answer

Employees can write "thank you" letters to their bosses to express gratitude for help on projects, career development opportunities and career advice. They can also thank their bosses in their resignation letters when they leave a company or write thank you letters to prospective employers after an interview.

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Full Answer

Thank you letters can be very useful tools. Gratitude can help build solid relationships and also help employees come across as being courteous. Employees can write appreciation letters to their employers any time they receive some kind of assistance, whether it is in the form of advice or time.

It is best to send physical thank you notes, as these come across as more thoughtful than emailed notes. Handwritten notes can be especially effective as they carry a personal touch. Employees should keep their notes short and concise. Briefly state why they are thanking their employer and how the assistance affected their projects or careers.

Gratitude is a very important part of resignation letters. After opening the resignation letter and expressing the reasons for leaving their position, employees should always dedicate a paragraph towards thanking their employers for the career opportunities they received at the organization, the skills they learned during the job and for any opportunities they were given to work on important projects.

Job seekers can also send thank you notes to express gratitude after job interviews. This not only shows appreciation, but also helps remind potential employers of their skills and experience. They can start interview thank you letters by expressing gratitude for the interviewer's time and then move on to highlight key points discussed during the interview, such as the organization's needs, how they can meet those needs and any relevant skills they have. They can then close their letters with a simple expression of thanks.

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