Q:

At what age can you receive full Social Security benefits?

A:

Quick Answer

Retirees filing for Social Security receive 100 percent of benefits at the age of 66, and the spouse of the retiree receives 50 percent of benefits. Retirees can file for benefits at the age of 62, but the payment amount is reduced, depending on the exact age of the claimant.

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At what age can you receive full Social Security benefits?
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Full Answer

While retirees receive the full amount of benefits at the age of 66 and can claim partial benefits at the age of 62, surviving spouses can begin claiming benefits at the age of 60. Those who become disabled and are unable to work can also receive benefits before retirement age, and when the age of retirement is reached, the claimant is automatically shifted to retirement benefits.

If a worker files for Social Security at the age of 62, the benefit amount drops to 75 percent of full benefits for the worker and 35 percent for the worker's spouse. For each month after the age of 62 that a worker waits to file for benefits, small percentages are added to the benefit amount of both the worker and spouse, topping out at 100 percent at age 66.

Those nearing or at retirement age can file for benefits at a local Social Security office, online or by calling 1-800-772-1213. Retirees can also apply for Medicare benefits at this time.

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