Q:

What causes white spots on the skin after tanning?

A:

Quick Answer

White spots that occur on the skin after tanning can be caused by a variety of reasons including low levels of melanin in the skin, a fungal infection and too much exposure to ultraviolet rays. Certain medications also make the skin sensitive to UV rays, which can cause white spots.

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Full Answer

White spots that are caused by a fungus can be prevented by using anti-fungal creams, which can be applied directly to the skin after tanning. The appearance of white spots caused by tanning can be minimized by applying a quality tanning lotion before lying in the sun or in a tanning bed.

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