Q:

What type of personality does Mercutio have?

A:

Quick Answer

Mercutio, a character in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," shows a playful and carefree personality much of the time, but can also be impatient. He has a zest for life and does not want to be tied down by romantic love or social proprieties.

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Full Answer

A relative to the Prince in the play, Mercutio is neither a Capulet nor a Montague and ends up cursing both families for their part in his death. He was invited to the Capulet ball in Act I, but prefers to sneak in with Benvolio and Romeo, thus showing his fun-loving nature. A foil to Romeo's character, Mercutio teases him when Romeo talks of a dream he had and cannot understand his friend's pining over Rosaline or his infatuation with Juliet. He loves word play, delivering puns with his dying breaths, even though obviously angry with both Tybalt and Romeo.

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