Q:

What promise does Lord Capulet make to Paris?

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Quick Answer

In act 3, scene 4 of William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," Lord Capulet promises Paris that Juliet will marry him in two days. When Juliet learns of this in a subsequent scene, she is distraught and refuses to go through with the marriage.

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Full Answer

Juliet's parents, Lord and Lady Capulet, do not take well to Juliet's refusal. Her father threatens to disown her, and her mother refuses Juliet's pleas to delay her marriage to Paris. Lord Capulet's hastiness in promising Juliet to Paris without even discussing it with his daughter is the catalyst for Juliet's eventual death. Because of the short time proposed for the marriage, she seeks a drug to make her appear dead for over three days. Finding her supposedly dead causes Romeo to commit suicide, an act which Juliet repeats when she awakens from her drugged sleep.

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