Q:

What are some poems appropriate for reading at your father's funeral?

A:

Quick Answer

Some poems appropriate for a father's funeral include "Irish Blessing," "That Man is a Success" by Ralph Waldo Emerson and "Goodbye to My Dad," written by Debra Marie Stratton-VanBuskirk. These poems are short enough to read during the funeral service, or can be printed in the funeral program, according to Next Gen Memorials.

Continue Reading
What are some poems appropriate for reading at your father's funeral?
Credit: kzenon iStock / Getty Images Plus Getty Images

Full Answer

The Irish Blessing reads, "May the road rise up to meet you. May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face, and, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand."

"That Man is a Success" is a Ralph Waldo Emerson poem that says, "That man is a success who has lived well, laughed often and loved much. Who has gained the respect of intelligent men and the love of children. Who has filled his niche and accomplished his task, who leaves the world better than he found it. Who has never lacked appreciation of Earth's beauty or failed to express it. Who looked for the best in others and gave the best he had," as stated on Next Gen Memorials.

"Goodbye to My Dad" says, "Goodbye Dad, I had to say, a few months ago on a cold winter day. I'll remember the good times and try not to be sad, but saying goodbye still hurts so bad. I miss you more than I can express, my love for you will never grow less. I keep trying to imagine how I will go on, I realize tomorrow is another dawn. I know you're in Heaven above, looking down on us with all your love only to whisper in our ear, 'Remember that I never stopped loving you, dear.' I'll always remember you each and every day and if I need to talk to you, I'll just sit down and pray. One day we'll be together again, to talk about all the places we've been. Until the time I'll always treasure, having you for a dad was such a great pleasure."

Learn more about Poetry

Related Questions

Explore