Q:

What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

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Quick Answer

In the original text of "Jack and the Beanstalk," the name of the giant is not given. However, most plays that are based on the story have the giant named Blunderbore. The giant goes by similar names in other versions of the story, including Blunderboar, Thunderbore, Blunderbus and Blunderbuss.

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What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?
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Full Answer

Blunderbore has many re-imaginations, including in video games like "Diablo II," television shoes like "Once Upon a Time" and "The Land of Stories" book series. The image of the giant also appears in many folk tales, and all have similar appearances. In most of these tales, the giant lives in an area called Penwith.

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