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What are the figures of speech used in the poem "Ulysses" by Alfred Lord Tennyson?

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The poet Alfred Lord Tennyson uses several figures of speech throughout his poem "Ulysses." The narrator Ulysses describes himself as "roaming with a hungry heart," which is a metaphor comparing himself to a predatory animal. The poem uses a metaphor to compare enjoying battle to drinking by saying, "And drunk delight of battle with my peers."

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The narrator also compares living life to drinking, when he says, "I will drink / Life to the lees," which is an old version of "living life to the fullest." The poem personifies the sea and a group of stars called the Hyades by saying, "the rainy Hyades / Vext the dim sea," giving human attributes to non-human objects. The poem has a simile in the line "To follow knowledge like a sinking star," which compares the pursuit of knowledge to using a star as a guide as sailors did. The poem uses the concept of night as a metaphor for his own death by describing the onset of night and appearance of the stars. The narrator of the poem refers to his sailors as "souls," which is a synecdoche, because it uses a part to stand in for the whole of the referred-to objects.

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