Poetry

A:

Spoken word is poetry meant to be read aloud and in front of an audience. According to Power Poetry, spoken word forms include stories, monologues and rap, as well as poems. Performances are highly stylized compared to traditional poetry readings.

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  • How Many Poems Did Emily Dickinson Write in Her Lifetime?

    Q: How Many Poems Did Emily Dickinson Write in Her Lifetime?

    A: Emily Dickinson wrote about 1,800 poems by the time she died in 1886 at age 56. Only a dozen were published during her life, and until her unpublished poetry was discovered in the 20th century she was unknown to literary scholars.
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  • What Was Robert Frost's Writing Style?

    Q: What Was Robert Frost's Writing Style?

    A: Robert Frost's writing style can best be described as a mix of 19th century tradition combined with 20th century contemporary technique. Frost was a modern poet who liked to use conventional form metrics combined with New England vernacular. His writing style changed gradually over time, becoming more abstract in his later years. Many experts believe this was largely due to his religious and political beliefs.
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  • What Are Some Poems About Hats?

    Q: What Are Some Poems About Hats?

    A: Some of the more well known poems about hats include the 1867 poem "Coom, don on thy Bonnet an' Shawl" by Thomas Blackah, "The Crumpetty Tree" by Edward Lear, "The Death of the Hat" by Billy Collins and "The List of Famous Hats" by James Tate. There is also a Bahamian American nursery rhyme called "Bat, Bat, Come Under My Hat."
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  • What Are Poems That Tell Stories Called?

    Q: What Are Poems That Tell Stories Called?

    A: Poems that tell stories are called narrative poems. There are several types of narrative poems, which include idyll, epic, ballad and lay. Narrative poems have existed for thousands of years and have served many purposes, including capturing the heroic actions of great leaders, such as King Arthur and Odysseus, and even setting the scene as the opening for television shows like "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air."
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  • What Are Poems That Don't Rhyme?

    Q: What Are Poems That Don't Rhyme?

    A: Poems that do not rhyme but still follow regular metrical patterns are called blank verse poems. Poems that do not rhyme or follow any metrical pattern are called free verse poems.
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  • What Is the Theme of the Poem "Oh Captain, My Captain"?

    Q: What Is the Theme of the Poem "Oh Captain, My Captain"?

    A: The theme of Walt Whitman's poem "Oh Captain, My Captain" is the death of President Abraham Lincoln just as the Civil War ends. The themes of mourning the death of the one who was the captain of the ship (the nation) and rejoicing over the victory intertwine throughout the poem.
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  • What Can I Put in a Poem for My Baby Niece?

    Q: What Can I Put in a Poem for My Baby Niece?

    A: The content of your poem for your baby niece will depend on a number of factors, such the occasion for which the poem is being written and your message to your baby niece. You can tell a story in verse format with your baby niece as the central character, or just describe your impression of her and convey your blessings and good wishes.
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  • What Is the Rhyme Scheme of Annabel Lee?

    Q: What Is the Rhyme Scheme of Annabel Lee?

    A: The poem "Annabel Lee" by Edgar Allen Poe employs an irregular rhyme scheme that shifts from verse to verse, yet constantly repeats the "ee" sound, rhyming with "Lee," in the even-numbered lines of each stanza. This pattern is broken only in the final stanza, in which the speaker takes an extra line to mourn his dead bride, then returns to the rhyming pattern established in the previous stanzas.
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  • What Is the Meaning of the Poem "Huswifery"?

    Q: What Is the Meaning of the Poem "Huswifery"?

    A: The meaning of the poem "Huswifery" depicts the desires of Edward Taylor to be closer to God while doing everything that is pleasing to the Puritan religion. The name of the poem is based off of the daily tasks that were expected of Puritan housewives, like spinning and weaving.
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  • How Do You Copyright a Poem?

    Q: How Do You Copyright a Poem?

    A: Copyrighting a poem requires filing an application with the U.S. Copyright Office, which is part of the Library of Congress, and paying a fee. Claims to copyright published and unpublished poems are filed as literary works in the U.S. Copyright Office. As of 2014, applying for a poem copyright is possible online by visiting U.S. Copyright Office website or through the mail by sending the application to the Copyright Office at 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington D.C. 20669-6000.
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  • What Are the Characteristics of a Lyric Poem?

    Q: What Are the Characteristics of a Lyric Poem?

    A: One of the most important characteristics of lyric poetry is the expression of personal feelings or thoughts. Other characteristics include a musical quality and the desire to express a specific emotion or mood.
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  • What Is a Dramatic Situation in Poetry?

    Q: What Is a Dramatic Situation in Poetry?

    A: A dramatic situation in poetry is the underlying plot line that is created to place the characters in conflict with themselves or others. It is a literary tool that is used to force the audience to become emotionally invested in the poem.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Poetry and Prose?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Poetry and Prose?

    A: Poetry typically follows some type of pattern while prose does not follow any formal patterns of verse. Most everyday writing is done in the form of prose.
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  • How Did the Fireside Poets Get Their Name?

    Q: How Did the Fireside Poets Get Their Name?

    A: The Fireside Poets got their name because people would read their poetry while sitting by a fireplace. These poets were the first American poets to truly compete with British poets for popularity in the United States and Great Britain.
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  • What Is Edgar Allan Poe's "single Effect" Idea?

    Q: What Is Edgar Allan Poe's "single Effect" Idea?

    A: Poe's concept of a "single effect" applies to short stories, and basically states that every element of a story should contribute to a single emotional effect of the story. This rule was important, because Poe was the founder of the short story, and this consequently became a foundational rule of the genre.
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  • Why Is Poetry Important in Afghanistan?

    Q: Why Is Poetry Important in Afghanistan?

    A: Poetry has its roots deep in Afghanistan history, starting in the court of the first Persian king who ordered Arabic poetry to be translated into Farsi for him. It binds together the many varying ethnic groups of Afghanistan. In addition to serving as a mass reservoir of cultural knowledge and history, oral literature operates simultaneously as a medium of communication and as a form of entertainment.
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  • What Is a Formula Poem?

    Q: What Is a Formula Poem?

    A: According to Susan Lake & Associates, a formula poem is simply a poem that is formed by using a specific formula. Some examples of formula poems include limericks, acrostics, haikus and diamantes.
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  • What Is Romantic Poetry?

    Q: What Is Romantic Poetry?

    A: Romantic poetry was written during the Romantic literary movement, which emphasized emotion, nature and individuality. This movement was most powerful at the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century.
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  • What Is the Theme of "Oranges" by Gary Soto?

    Q: What Is the Theme of "Oranges" by Gary Soto?

    A: The themes present in the poem "Oranges" by Gary Soto include love, maturation and poverty. The poem is an account of a first date between a young boy and girl. Although Soto never explicitly uses the word "love" to describe the relationship between the young couple, the emotion saturates the poem.
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  • What Were Langston Hughes' Major Accomplishments?

    Q: What Were Langston Hughes' Major Accomplishments?

    A: Langston Hughes was one of the most prominent black poets of the Harlem Renaissance. His accomplishments include publishing his first poem, "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," to critical acclaim; winning several major literary awards for his poems, plays, short stories and novels; founding theaters; teaching at universities; and being a major contributor to the Harlem Renaissance and helping to shape American literature.
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  • What Does the Poem "White Man's Burden" Mean?

    Q: What Does the Poem "White Man's Burden" Mean?

    A: Rudyard Kipling's poem, "White Man's Burden," is a praise of American colonialism in the Philippines after Spain relinquished control in 1898. Kipling believed that American colonialism would improve conditions in the Philippines, despite many American's believing it was a burden, and he wrote the poem to encourage Americans to participate in colonialism.
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