Poetry

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Some of the more well known poems about hats include the 1867 poem "Coom, don on thy Bonnet an' Shawl" by Thomas Blackah, "The Crumpetty Tree" by Edward Lear, "The Death of the Hat" by Billy Collins and "The List of Famous Hats" by James Tate. There is also a Bahamian American nursery rhyme called "Bat, Bat, Come Under My Hat."

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  • What Are Some Poems About Fruits and Vegetables?

    Q: What Are Some Poems About Fruits and Vegetables?

    A: Some poems about fruits and vegetables include: "Fruits and Vegetables" by Geneen Myers, "To a Field of Celery" by Alfred Hitch and "Peaches" by Hattie Howard. "Fruits and Vegetables" talks about various fruits and vegetables, "To a Field of Celery" describes a personal relationship with vegetables and "Peaches" describes how delicious and enticing peaches are.
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  • What Can I Put in a Poem for My Baby Niece?

    Q: What Can I Put in a Poem for My Baby Niece?

    A: The content of your poem for your baby niece will depend on a number of factors, such the occasion for which the poem is being written and your message to your baby niece. You can tell a story in verse format with your baby niece as the central character, or just describe your impression of her and convey your blessings and good wishes.
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  • What Is the Meaning of "Leaves of Grass?"

    Q: What Is the Meaning of "Leaves of Grass?"

    A: According to an analysis on Cliffs Notes of "Leaves of Grass" by Walt Whitman, the three main themes are a celebration of his own individuality, an appreciation of America and democracy, and an expression of universal themes, such as birth, death and resurrection. For Whitman, democracy encompassed both the equal rights before the law of political democracy and the virtue of the individual of spiritual democracy.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Poetry and Prose?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Poetry and Prose?

    A: Poetry typically follows some type of pattern while prose does not follow any formal patterns of verse. Most everyday writing is done in the form of prose.
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  • What Is Romantic Poetry?

    Q: What Is Romantic Poetry?

    A: Romantic poetry was written during the Romantic literary movement, which emphasized emotion, nature and individuality. This movement was most powerful at the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century.
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  • Where Can You Find a Simple Poem About a Church Homecoming Service?

    Q: Where Can You Find a Simple Poem About a Church Homecoming Service?

    A: Homecoming poems can be found on Christian or church websites such as Christian Resources, Faith Writers and PoemHunter.com. Homecoming commemorates the history of a church and its members past and present, celebrates its anniversary, or both. Therefore, the exact theme of the homecoming should be verified with church leadership.
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  • What Is an Example of Farce Poetry?

    Q: What Is an Example of Farce Poetry?

    A: One of the greatest examples of farce poetry is "Don Juan" by Lord Byron. Farce poetry is marked by over-exaggeration of either characters or plot in developing a point that is often mocking in nature.
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  • What Are the Main Themes of Edgar Allan Poe's Poem "The Raven"?

    Q: What Are the Main Themes of Edgar Allan Poe's Poem "The Raven"?

    A: The main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven" are undying devotion, loss and the lingering grief that cannot be diminished. The poem's narrator, a young man and presumably a student, is mourning the death of his lover, Lenore. Despite his attempts to lessen his grief through his studies and his pondering "many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore," he is wrenched back to his sorrow by a talking raven who repeatedly utters the famous refrain "nevermore," a painful reference to the fact that the narrator will never again be reunited with his beloved Lenore.
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  • What Are Some Poems About Hats?

    Q: What Are Some Poems About Hats?

    A: Some of the more well known poems about hats include the 1867 poem "Coom, don on thy Bonnet an' Shawl" by Thomas Blackah, "The Crumpetty Tree" by Edward Lear, "The Death of the Hat" by Billy Collins and "The List of Famous Hats" by James Tate. There is also a Bahamian American nursery rhyme called "Bat, Bat, Come Under My Hat."
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  • What Are Some Thank You Poems for Teachers?

    Q: What Are Some Thank You Poems for Teachers?

    A: A simple "thank you" poem for an elementary school or prekindergarten teacher could say, "Thank you teacher for helping me to grow. You guided me and showed me lots of things I didn't know. I learned so much from you and I can't wait to share my knowledge. I'll always remember your very kind ways, even when I get to college!"
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  • What Are Poems That Tell Stories Called?

    Q: What Are Poems That Tell Stories Called?

    A: Poems that tell stories are called narrative poems. There are several types of narrative poems, which include idyll, epic, ballad and lay. Narrative poems have existed for thousands of years and have served many purposes, including capturing the heroic actions of great leaders, such as King Arthur and Odysseus, and even setting the scene as the opening for television shows like "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air."
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  • What Is Dramatic Poetry?

    Q: What Is Dramatic Poetry?

    A: Dramatic poetry is poetry written specifically for the theater. This type of poetry can often be lyrical in nature, such as when a character in a play gives a dramatic monologue.
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  • What Best Describes Romantic Poetry?

    Q: What Best Describes Romantic Poetry?

    A: Romantic poetry emphasizes natural, emotional and personal themes, it values intuition over reason, and it idealizes country life. Romantic poets preferred writing in colloquial language rather than the consciously poetic language of previous eras.
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  • How Did the Fireside Poets Get Their Name?

    Q: How Did the Fireside Poets Get Their Name?

    A: The Fireside Poets got their name because people would read their poetry while sitting by a fireplace. These poets were the first American poets to truly compete with British poets for popularity in the United States and Great Britain.
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  • What Are Metaphor Poems for Kids?

    Q: What Are Metaphor Poems for Kids?

    A: Children's metaphor poems are less complex than their adult counterparts, as children generally do not have the same level of reading comprehension as adults and hence may not be able to so easily grasp the symbolic nature of this style of poetry. Typically, the entire poem is shaped around one large, over-arching metaphor.
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  • What Is a Metrical Romance Poem?

    Q: What Is a Metrical Romance Poem?

    A: A metrical romance poem is a type of prose poem that was especially popular during the Renaissance. These poems do not rhyme and deal with themes such as love, rites of passage, chivalry, adventure and interpersonal relationships. Knights, fair maidens and epic journeys appear frequently in metrical romance poems.
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  • What Is the Meaning of the Poem "Huswifery"?

    Q: What Is the Meaning of the Poem "Huswifery"?

    A: The meaning of the poem "Huswifery" depicts the desires of Edward Taylor to be closer to God while doing everything that is pleasing to the Puritan religion. The name of the poem is based off of the daily tasks that were expected of Puritan housewives, like spinning and weaving.
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  • What Are Examples of Assonance in The Raven?

    Q: What Are Examples of Assonance in The Raven?

    A: Assonance occurs in the poem ‘The Raven’ by Edgar Allen Poe in several lines, including "while I pondered weak and weary." Assonance is the repetition of vowels (a, e, I, o, u and sometimes y) in poems; in the passage cited, the repetition of the vowels "ea" in the words "weak" and "weary" is assonance. In addition to repetition in vowels, assonance also consists of repetition in sounds, such as long vowel sounds or short sounds.
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  • What Is the Candy Cane Poem?

    Q: What Is the Candy Cane Poem?

    A: The candy cane poem is a poem that is often used in religious settings to compare a candy cane to the sacrifice that Jesus made. It is often used at Christmas time to minister to children.
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  • What Is the Effect of Repetition?

    Q: What Is the Effect of Repetition?

    A: Some effects of repetition include pattern recognition, habit formation, memorization, familiarity and comprehension. In general, the human brain is naturally hard-wired to make associations through repetition. These associations are not always good, however. Sometimes, people grow to dislike things as a result of too much repetition.
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  • What Is a Four-Line Stanza Called?

    Q: What Is a Four-Line Stanza Called?

    A: A four-line stanza is called a quatrain. Quatrains can be rhymed or metered. They are usually separated from each other by blank lines or different indentations.
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