Poetry

A:

The overt moral lesson in "The Pardoner's Tale" is that greed is the root of all evil, as it is explicitly stated by the pardoner. In addition, gluttony, drunkeness, gambling and swearing are each discussed in the "Prologue to the Pardoner's Tale" as moral vices to be avoided.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • How should you write a poem for an unborn grandchild?

    Q: How should you write a poem for an unborn grandchild?

    A: Write a poem for an unborn grandchild to read at a baby shower or other special event. Include your reaction when you found out about becoming a grandparent, as well as your hopes for your future relationship with your grandchild.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is poetry important in Afghanistan?

    Q: Why is poetry important in Afghanistan?

    A: Poetry has its roots deep in Afghanistan history, starting in the court of the first Persian king who ordered Arabic poetry to be translated into Farsi for him. It binds together the many varying ethnic groups of Afghanistan. In addition to serving as a mass reservoir of cultural knowledge and history, oral literature operates simultaneously as a medium of communication and as a form of entertainment.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a cute poem you would send to your ex-boyfriend that you still love and miss very much?

    Q: What is a cute poem you would send to your ex-boyfriend that you still love and miss very much?

    A: To choose a light-hearted love poem to send to an ex-boyfriend, look into poems by Ogden Nash or e. e. cummings, depending on how overtly you wish to state your love. Both poets are famous for their craft and whimsy, but differ greatly in their impact.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the poem "Mushrooms" by Sylvia Plath about?

    Q: What is the poem "Mushrooms" by Sylvia Plath about?

    A: Critics consider "Mushrooms" to be about feminism. The mushrooms are symbols for women who are growing into their rightful place in society.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does the poem "White Man's Burden" mean?

    Q: What does the poem "White Man's Burden" mean?

    A: Rudyard Kipling's poem, "White Man's Burden," is a praise of American colonialism in the Philippines after Spain relinquished control in 1898. Kipling believed that American colonialism would improve conditions in the Philippines, despite many American's believing it was a burden, and he wrote the poem to encourage Americans to participate in colonialism.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is narrative poetry?

    Q: What is narrative poetry?

    A: Narrative poetry is poetry that tells a story and has a plot. The poem does not have to rhyme, nor does it have to have a set length.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a summary of Jose Rizal's poem "Memory of my Town"?

    Q: What is a summary of Jose Rizal's poem "Memory of my Town"?

    A: Jose Rizal's poem "In Memory of My Town" or "Un Recuerdo A Mi Pueblo" expresses the writer's nostalgia for the town of his birth, Calamba in Laguna. The Philippine writer was a 15-year old student at the time he wrote the poem in 1876.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are food poems?

    Q: What are food poems?

    A: A food poem is simply a poem about food. The poem can be about specific foods, like apples or pork, or specific food groups like fruits and vegetables, diary or grains. The only requirement to classify a poem as a food poem is that its content is about food.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do you copyright a poem?

    Q: How do you copyright a poem?

    A: Copyrighting a poem requires filing an application with the U.S. Copyright Office, which is part of the Library of Congress, and paying a fee. Claims to copyright published and unpublished poems are filed as literary works in the U.S. Copyright Office. As of 2014, applying for a poem copyright is possible online by visiting U.S. Copyright Office website or through the mail by sending the application to the Copyright Office at 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington D.C. 20669-6000.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What was the longest poem ever written?

    Q: What was the longest poem ever written?

    A: The longest poem ever written is "The Mahabharata" by Vyasa the respected Hindu figure. He was believed to be the incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu. The Mahabharata is 10 times longer than the Iliad and Odyssey combined. It has over 1.8 million words and more than 100,000 verses.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are Christmas candy poems?

    Q: What are Christmas candy poems?

    A: Christmas candy poems are poems that relate Christmas to candy either through cheerful wishes or the telling of the Christmas story. The idea behind these poems is to attach a copy of the poem to the referenced candy and present it as a gift.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What influenced Maya Angelou to write?

    Q: What influenced Maya Angelou to write?

    A: According to Biography.com, author James Baldwin convinced Maya Angelou to write about her life. The result was the 1969 bestselling memoir, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings;" it led to international recognition for Angelou.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is Edgar Allan Poe's "single effect" idea?

    Q: What is Edgar Allan Poe's "single effect" idea?

    A: Poe's concept of a "single effect" applies to short stories, and basically states that every element of a story should contribute to a single emotional effect of the story. This rule was important, because Poe was the founder of the short story, and this consequently became a foundational rule of the genre.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are examples of fixed form poetry?

    Q: What are examples of fixed form poetry?

    A: The term fixed form poem, also known as closed-form poem, simply means that the verse follows a specific or fixed way of being written. Examples of this form include sonnets, haikus, villanelles or limericks. These have rigid structures of meters, stanzas and rhyme schemes. An example of a haiku written by Matshuo Basho is: “An old silent pond ... frog jumps into the pond, splash! Silence again."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a good sports haiku?

    Q: What is a good sports haiku?

    A: The Haiku Poems and Poets site provides many haiku with sports themes. A haiku about kids who love to play football even though it's raining is "The kids love football/ but it's raining hard today/ muddy kids don't care."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the symbolism in "The Road Not Taken"?

    Q: What is the symbolism in "The Road Not Taken"?

    A: In the poem "The Road Not Taken," the two roads in the woods symbolize the choices one makes in life. From descriptions in the poem, the paths are worn about the same, which shows that the choices people make in life are often more random than they think. "The Road Not Taken" was written by Robert Frost and published in 1916.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

    Q: What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

    A: The main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven" are undying devotion, loss and the lingering grief that cannot be diminished. The poem's narrator, a young man and presumably a student, is mourning the death of his lover, Lenore. Despite his attempts to lessen his grief through his studies and his pondering "many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore," he is wrenched back to his sorrow by a talking raven who repeatedly utters the famous refrain "nevermore," a painful reference to the fact that the narrator will never again be reunited with his beloved Lenore.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the theme of the poem "Oh Captain, My Captain"?

    Q: What is the theme of the poem "Oh Captain, My Captain"?

    A: The theme of Walt Whitman's poem "Oh Captain, My Captain" is the death of President Abraham Lincoln just as the Civil War ends. The themes of mourning the death of the one who was the captain of the ship (the nation) and rejoicing over the victory intertwine throughout the poem.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a metrical romance poem?

    Q: What is a metrical romance poem?

    A: A metrical romance poem is a type of prose poem that was especially popular during the Renaissance. These poems do not rhyme and deal with themes such as love, rites of passage, chivalry, adventure and interpersonal relationships. Knights, fair maidens and epic journeys appear frequently in metrical romance poems.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does the saying "Oh! what a tangled web we weave/When first we practice to deceive!" mean?

    Q: What does the saying "Oh! what a tangled web we weave/When first we practice to deceive!" mean?

    A: The quote "Oh! What a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive" refers to how complicated life becomes when people start lying. It originally referred to a love triangle in the play “Marmion” by Sir Walter Scott.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is spoken word poetry?

    Q: What is spoken word poetry?

    A: Spoken word is poetry meant to be read aloud and in front of an audience. According to Power Poetry, spoken word forms include stories, monologues and rap, as well as poems. Performances are highly stylized compared to traditional poetry readings.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: