Poetry

A:

"Idiom poem" is not a formal literary term or category. It is thus up to personal interpretation, but it could either be any poem that makes use of idioms as its central focus or any poem written in a non-standard dialect of a language.

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  • What is narrative poetry?

    Q: What is narrative poetry?

    A: Narrative poetry is poetry that tells a story and has a plot. The poem does not have to rhyme, nor does it have to have a set length.
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  • What can I put in a poem for my baby niece?

    Q: What can I put in a poem for my baby niece?

    A: The content of your poem for your baby niece will depend on a number of factors, such the occasion for which the poem is being written and your message to your baby niece. You can tell a story in verse format with your baby niece as the central character, or just describe your impression of her and convey your blessings and good wishes.
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  • How should you write a poem for an unborn grandchild?

    Q: How should you write a poem for an unborn grandchild?

    A: Write a poem for an unborn grandchild to read at a baby shower or other special event. Include your reaction when you found out about becoming a grandparent, as well as your hopes for your future relationship with your grandchild.
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  • What is a letter poem?

    Q: What is a letter poem?

    A: A letter poem, more commonly referred to as an epistolary poem, is a poetry form that follows a letter-like format. The earliest known epistolary poems date back to the early Roman poet Ovid, whose work "The Heroides" was written from the vantage of heroines of Greek and Roman mythology.
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  • What is a blazon in poetry?

    Q: What is a blazon in poetry?

    A: A blazon (also referred to as a blason) is a poem in which the speaker describes his lover's body. It focuses on various parts of a woman's body, emphasizing her physical beauty.
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  • What is the rhyme scheme of Annabel Lee?

    Q: What is the rhyme scheme of Annabel Lee?

    A: The poem "Annabel Lee" by Edgar Allen Poe employs an irregular rhyme scheme that shifts from verse to verse, yet constantly repeats the "ee" sound, rhyming with "Lee," in the even-numbered lines of each stanza. This pattern is broken only in the final stanza, in which the speaker takes an extra line to mourn his dead bride, then returns to the rhyming pattern established in the previous stanzas.
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  • What does the poem "White Man's Burden" mean?

    Q: What does the poem "White Man's Burden" mean?

    A: Rudyard Kipling's poem, "White Man's Burden," is a praise of American colonialism in the Philippines after Spain relinquished control in 1898. Kipling believed that American colonialism would improve conditions in the Philippines, despite many American's believing it was a burden, and he wrote the poem to encourage Americans to participate in colonialism.
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  • What is the theme of "Oranges" by Gary Soto?

    Q: What is the theme of "Oranges" by Gary Soto?

    A: The themes present in the poem "Oranges" by Gary Soto include love, maturation and poverty. The poem is an account of a first date between a young boy and girl. Although Soto never explicitly uses the word "love" to describe the relationship between the young couple, the emotion saturates the poem.
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  • What is the effect of repetition?

    Q: What is the effect of repetition?

    A: Some effects of repetition include pattern recognition, habit formation, memorization, familiarity and comprehension. In general, the human brain is naturally hard-wired to make associations through repetition. These associations are not always good, however. Sometimes, people grow to dislike things as a result of too much repetition.
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  • What is the theme of "Still I Rise"?

    Q: What is the theme of "Still I Rise"?

    A: "Still I Rise" is a poem by Maya Angelou that speaks to her ancestor's origins as slaves and her personal resilience in the face of opposition. "I rise" and variations of it are repeated throughout the poem to show that nothing can stand in her way.
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  • What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

    Q: What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

    A: The main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven" are undying devotion, loss and the lingering grief that cannot be diminished. The poem's narrator, a young man and presumably a student, is mourning the death of his lover, Lenore. Despite his attempts to lessen his grief through his studies and his pondering "many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore," he is wrenched back to his sorrow by a talking raven who repeatedly utters the famous refrain "nevermore," a painful reference to the fact that the narrator will never again be reunited with his beloved Lenore.
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  • What is a mood in a poem?

    Q: What is a mood in a poem?

    A: A poem's mood refers to the emotions evoked by the poem's language. When poets use words to specifically inspire feelings of sadness, anger, joy or other emotions, those words contribute to the poem's mood.
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  • What are the rules for making a haiku?

    Q: What are the rules for making a haiku?

    A: A haiku contains three lines. There are five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line and five syllables in the third line. Rhyming is not necessary. Rules regarding word repetition, punctuation and capitalization are left to the writer's discretion.
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  • What are examples of assonance in The Raven?

    Q: What are examples of assonance in The Raven?

    A: Assonance occurs in the poem ‘The Raven’ by Edgar Allen Poe in several lines, including "while I pondered weak and weary." Assonance is the repetition of vowels (a, e, I, o, u and sometimes y) in poems; in the passage cited, the repetition of the vowels "ea" in the words "weak" and "weary" is assonance. In addition to repetition in vowels, assonance also consists of repetition in sounds, such as long vowel sounds or short sounds.
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  • What are some thank you poems for teachers?

    Q: What are some thank you poems for teachers?

    A: A simple "thank you" poem for an elementary school or prekindergarten teacher could say, "Thank you teacher for helping me to grow. You guided me and showed me lots of things I didn't know. I learned so much from you and I can't wait to share my knowledge. I'll always remember your very kind ways, even when I get to college!"
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  • What are metaphor poems for kids?

    Q: What are metaphor poems for kids?

    A: Children's metaphor poems are less complex than their adult counterparts, as children generally do not have the same level of reading comprehension as adults and hence may not be able to so easily grasp the symbolic nature of this style of poetry. Typically, the entire poem is shaped around one large, over-arching metaphor.
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  • What are poems for teenage mothers?

    Q: What are poems for teenage mothers?

    A: Poems for teenage mothers are poems that focus on teenage pregnancy, typically written for or by adolescents experiencing pregnancy. Websites such as Best Teen Poems, Poem Hunter, and Power Poetry maintain extensive collections of poems regarding teen motherhood. The Best Teen Poems site allows readers to search by rating, making it easy to find the most popular poems on the subject in their collection.
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  • What is spoken word poetry?

    Q: What is spoken word poetry?

    A: Spoken word is poetry meant to be read aloud and in front of an audience. According to Power Poetry, spoken word forms include stories, monologues and rap, as well as poems. Performances are highly stylized compared to traditional poetry readings.
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  • How many poems did Emily Dickinson write in her lifetime?

    Q: How many poems did Emily Dickinson write in her lifetime?

    A: Emily Dickinson wrote about 1,800 poems by the time she died in 1886 at age 56. Only a dozen were published during her life, and until her unpublished poetry was discovered in the 20th century she was unknown to literary scholars.
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  • What best describes romantic poetry?

    Q: What best describes romantic poetry?

    A: Romantic poetry emphasizes natural, emotional and personal themes, it values intuition over reason, and it idealizes country life. Romantic poets preferred writing in colloquial language rather than the consciously poetic language of previous eras.
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  • Who was William Wordsworth?

    Q: Who was William Wordsworth?

    A: William Wordsworth, an English poet who lived from 1770 to 1850, was a major figure in the Romantic Age of English literature. Wordsworth’s publication of “Lyrical Ballads” in 1798 with another poet, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, marked a major change of poetic style and direction.
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