Poetry

A:

A food poem is simply a poem about food. The poem can be about specific foods, like apples or pork, or specific food groups like fruits and vegetables, diary or grains. The only requirement to classify a poem as a food poem is that its content is about food.

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  • What Is the Symbolism in "The Road Not Taken"?

    Q: What Is the Symbolism in "The Road Not Taken"?

    A: In the poem "The Road Not Taken," the two roads in the woods symbolize the choices one makes in life. From descriptions in the poem, the paths are worn about the same, which shows that the choices people make in life are often more random than they think. "The Road Not Taken" was written by Robert Frost and published in 1916.
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  • What Is the Theme of "Oranges" by Gary Soto?

    Q: What Is the Theme of "Oranges" by Gary Soto?

    A: The themes present in the poem "Oranges" by Gary Soto include love, maturation and poverty. The poem is an account of a first date between a young boy and girl. Although Soto never explicitly uses the word "love" to describe the relationship between the young couple, the emotion saturates the poem.
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  • What Are the Rules for Making a Haiku?

    Q: What Are the Rules for Making a Haiku?

    A: A haiku contains three lines. There are five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line and five syllables in the third line. Rhyming is not necessary. Rules regarding word repetition, punctuation and capitalization are left to the writer's discretion.
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  • What Is Narrative Poetry?

    Q: What Is Narrative Poetry?

    A: Narrative poetry is poetry that tells a story and has a plot. The poem does not have to rhyme, nor does it have to have a set length.
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  • What Was the Longest Poem Ever Written?

    Q: What Was the Longest Poem Ever Written?

    A: The longest poem ever written is "The Mahabharata" by Vyasa the respected Hindu figure. He was believed to be the incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu. The Mahabharata is 10 times longer than the Iliad and Odyssey combined. It has over 1.8 million words and more than 100,000 verses.
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  • What Are Poems That Don't Rhyme?

    Q: What Are Poems That Don't Rhyme?

    A: Poems that do not rhyme but still follow regular metrical patterns are called blank verse poems. Poems that do not rhyme or follow any metrical pattern are called free verse poems.
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  • What Are the Moral Lessons in the "Pardoner's Tale"?

    Q: What Are the Moral Lessons in the "Pardoner's Tale"?

    A: The overt moral lesson in "The Pardoner's Tale" is that greed is the root of all evil, as it is explicitly stated by the pardoner. In addition, gluttony, drunkeness, gambling and swearing are each discussed in the "Prologue to the Pardoner's Tale" as moral vices to be avoided.
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  • How Do You Copyright a Poem?

    Q: How Do You Copyright a Poem?

    A: Copyrighting a poem requires filing an application with the U.S. Copyright Office, which is part of the Library of Congress, and paying a fee. Claims to copyright published and unpublished poems are filed as literary works in the U.S. Copyright Office. As of 2014, applying for a poem copyright is possible online by visiting U.S. Copyright Office website or through the mail by sending the application to the Copyright Office at 101 Independence Avenue, SE Washington D.C. 20669-6000.
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  • What Are 12-Line Poems?

    Q: What Are 12-Line Poems?

    A: While a sonnet has 14 lines, a 12-line poem is identifiable in literature as a variation of the sonnet used by Elizabethan poets. Other than this example, there is no distinct term for a 12-line poem in English literature.
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  • How Many Poems Did Emily Dickinson Write in Her Lifetime?

    Q: How Many Poems Did Emily Dickinson Write in Her Lifetime?

    A: Emily Dickinson wrote about 1,800 poems by the time she died in 1886 at age 56. Only a dozen were published during her life, and until her unpublished poetry was discovered in the 20th century she was unknown to literary scholars.
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  • What Are Examples of Fixed Form Poetry?

    Q: What Are Examples of Fixed Form Poetry?

    A: The term fixed form poem, also known as closed-form poem, simply means that the verse follows a specific or fixed way of being written. Examples of this form include sonnets, haikus, villanelles or limericks. These have rigid structures of meters, stanzas and rhyme schemes. An example of a haiku written by Matshuo Basho is: “An old silent pond ... frog jumps into the pond, splash! Silence again."
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  • What Are the Characteristics of a Lyric Poem?

    Q: What Are the Characteristics of a Lyric Poem?

    A: One of the most important characteristics of lyric poetry is the expression of personal feelings or thoughts. Other characteristics include a musical quality and the desire to express a specific emotion or mood.
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  • What Is the Theme of the Poem "If" by Rudyard Kipling?

    Q: What Is the Theme of the Poem "If" by Rudyard Kipling?

    A: The theme of Rudyard Kipling's poem "If" revolves around the coming of age of his son and the poem lists different virtues that would help his child become a man. The last line of the poem directly refers to the son, which makes it sound far more personal than it was at the beginning.
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  • What Are Some Poems About Hats?

    Q: What Are Some Poems About Hats?

    A: Some of the more well known poems about hats include the 1867 poem "Coom, don on thy Bonnet an' Shawl" by Thomas Blackah, "The Crumpetty Tree" by Edward Lear, "The Death of the Hat" by Billy Collins and "The List of Famous Hats" by James Tate. There is also a Bahamian American nursery rhyme called "Bat, Bat, Come Under My Hat."
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  • What Is a Metrical Pattern in Poetry?

    Q: What Is a Metrical Pattern in Poetry?

    A: Metrical patterns refer to the way a poet creates rhythm by arranging stressed and unstressed syllables within a line of poetry. Along with the length of the line, metrical patterns are the most basic technique a poet employs to create rhythm. Poets utilize a number of different metrical patterns to this end.
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  • What Is a Formula Poem?

    Q: What Is a Formula Poem?

    A: According to Susan Lake & Associates, a formula poem is simply a poem that is formed by using a specific formula. Some examples of formula poems include limericks, acrostics, haikus and diamantes.
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  • What Is the Poem "Bluebird" by Charles Bukowski About?

    Q: What Is the Poem "Bluebird" by Charles Bukowski About?

    A: "Bluebird" is a poem about a person who hides from himself, afraid to let his sadness show. This inner self is what he calls the "bluebird in my heart." He tries to be strong by keeping his feelings restrained; on the outside, he must be tough so that no one will know the pain he carries on the inside.
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  • What Does the Saying "Oh! What a Tangled Web We Weave/When First We Practice to Deceive!" Mean?

    Q: What Does the Saying "Oh! What a Tangled Web We Weave/When First We Practice to Deceive!" Mean?

    A: The quote "Oh! What a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive" refers to how complicated life becomes when people start lying. It originally referred to a love triangle in the play “Marmion” by Sir Walter Scott.
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  • What Is the Candy Cane Poem?

    Q: What Is the Candy Cane Poem?

    A: The candy cane poem is a poem that is often used in religious settings to compare a candy cane to the sacrifice that Jesus made. It is often used at Christmas time to minister to children.
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  • What Is the Theme of the Poem "Oh Captain, My Captain"?

    Q: What Is the Theme of the Poem "Oh Captain, My Captain"?

    A: The theme of Walt Whitman's poem "Oh Captain, My Captain" is the death of President Abraham Lincoln just as the Civil War ends. The themes of mourning the death of the one who was the captain of the ship (the nation) and rejoicing over the victory intertwine throughout the poem.
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  • What Are the Characteristics of Victorian Period Poetry?

    Q: What Are the Characteristics of Victorian Period Poetry?

    A: Following in the footsteps of their Romantic forefathers, Victorian poets focused on themes of skepticism and distrust of organized religion. Their poetry is imbued with a fascination of the occult and mysterious. However, unlike the Romantics, the Victorian poets were more likely to deny the existence of God through scientific means. Their poetry was more light-hearted and humorous, often whimsical or nonsensical.
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