Poetry

A:

Poems that do not rhyme but still follow regular metrical patterns are called blank verse poems. Poems that do not rhyme or follow any metrical pattern are called free verse poems.

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  • What are the rules for making a haiku?

    Q: What are the rules for making a haiku?

    A: A haiku contains three lines. There are five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line and five syllables in the third line. Rhyming is not necessary. Rules regarding word repetition, punctuation and capitalization are left to the writer's discretion.
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  • What is the poem "Mushrooms" by Sylvia Plath about?

    Q: What is the poem "Mushrooms" by Sylvia Plath about?

    A: Critics consider "Mushrooms" to be about feminism. The mushrooms are symbols for women who are growing into their rightful place in society.
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  • What are some poems about hats?

    Q: What are some poems about hats?

    A: Some of the more well known poems about hats include the 1867 poem "Coom, don on thy Bonnet an' Shawl" by Thomas Blackah, "The Crumpetty Tree" by Edward Lear, "The Death of the Hat" by Billy Collins and "The List of Famous Hats" by James Tate. There is also a Bahamian American nursery rhyme called "Bat, Bat, Come Under My Hat."
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  • What are food poems?

    Q: What are food poems?

    A: A food poem is simply a poem about food. The poem can be about specific foods, like apples or pork, or specific food groups like fruits and vegetables, diary or grains. The only requirement to classify a poem as a food poem is that its content is about food.
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  • What is the symbolism in "The Road Not Taken"?

    Q: What is the symbolism in "The Road Not Taken"?

    A: In the poem "The Road Not Taken," the two roads in the woods symbolize the choices one makes in life. From descriptions in the poem, the paths are worn about the same, which shows that the choices people make in life are often more random than they think. "The Road Not Taken" was written by Robert Frost and published in 1916.
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  • What is a poem for a grandmother from a grandchild?

    Q: What is a poem for a grandmother from a grandchild?

    A: According to PoetrySoup, a poem by Mike Santiago titled "To Grandmother" is written from the perspective of a grandchild to a grandmother. The poem is short and includes the reasons why the narrator appreciates his grandmother.
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  • What are the characteristics of a lyric poem?

    Q: What are the characteristics of a lyric poem?

    A: One of the most important characteristics of lyric poetry is the expression of personal feelings or thoughts. Other characteristics include a musical quality and the desire to express a specific emotion or mood.
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  • What was "Alone" by Edgar Allan Poe about?

    Q: What was "Alone" by Edgar Allan Poe about?

    A: The poem "Alone" by Edgar Allan Poe presents the thoughts of an adult reflecting on his difficult childhood. The narrator says that his stormy temperament comes from spending most of his childhood years alone. Because he did not have anyone with which to share his emotions, the narrator did not develop emotionally as a typical child would. Many scholars interpret the poem as an autobiographical introspective on Poe's youth.
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  • What are funny Christmas poems?

    Q: What are funny Christmas poems?

    A: Funny Christmas poems include "Christmas Cheer," "A Politically Correct Christmas Poem" and "Neath Mistletoe." These poems are meant to highlight the lighter side of Christmas.
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  • What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

    Q: What are the main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven"?

    A: The main themes of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven" are undying devotion, loss and the lingering grief that cannot be diminished. The poem's narrator, a young man and presumably a student, is mourning the death of his lover, Lenore. Despite his attempts to lessen his grief through his studies and his pondering "many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore," he is wrenched back to his sorrow by a talking raven who repeatedly utters the famous refrain "nevermore," a painful reference to the fact that the narrator will never again be reunited with his beloved Lenore.
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  • What is the poem "Bluebird" by Charles Bukowski about?

    Q: What is the poem "Bluebird" by Charles Bukowski about?

    A: "Bluebird" is a poem about a person who hides from himself, afraid to let his sadness show. This inner self is what he calls the "bluebird in my heart." He tries to be strong by keeping his feelings restrained; on the outside, he must be tough so that no one will know the pain he carries on the inside.
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  • What is the "Merry Christmas from Heaven" poem?

    Q: What is the "Merry Christmas from Heaven" poem?

    A: "Merry Christmas from Heaven" is a poem written by John W. Moody, Jr. that was intended to help his family adjust to the death of his mother, Rita Mooney. Christmas Eve was John's parents' wedding anniversary, which the family celebrated at that time.
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  • Why is poetry important in Afghanistan?

    Q: Why is poetry important in Afghanistan?

    A: Poetry has its roots deep in Afghanistan history, starting in the court of the first Persian king who ordered Arabic poetry to be translated into Farsi for him. It binds together the many varying ethnic groups of Afghanistan. In addition to serving as a mass reservoir of cultural knowledge and history, oral literature operates simultaneously as a medium of communication and as a form of entertainment.
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  • What are the characteristics of Victorian period poetry?

    Q: What are the characteristics of Victorian period poetry?

    A: Following in the footsteps of their Romantic forefathers, Victorian poets focused on themes of skepticism and distrust of organized religion. Their poetry is imbued with a fascination of the occult and mysterious. However, unlike the Romantics, the Victorian poets were more likely to deny the existence of God through scientific means. Their poetry was more light-hearted and humorous, often whimsical or nonsensical.
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  • What were Langston Hughes' major accomplishments?

    Q: What were Langston Hughes' major accomplishments?

    A: Langston Hughes was one of the most prominent black poets of the Harlem Renaissance. His accomplishments include publishing his first poem, "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," to critical acclaim; winning several major literary awards for his poems, plays, short stories and novels; founding theaters; teaching at universities; and being a major contributor to the Harlem Renaissance and helping to shape American literature.
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  • What is "Ballad of a Mother's Heart"?

    Q: What is "Ballad of a Mother's Heart"?

    A: "Ballad of a Mother's Heart" is a poem written by Jose la Villa Tierra. The poem utilizes third-person narration and tells a brief tale of a love-struck young man willing to betray his mother for a fair maiden.
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  • What is the meaning of the poem "Huswifery"?

    Q: What is the meaning of the poem "Huswifery"?

    A: The meaning of the poem "Huswifery" depicts the desires of Edward Taylor to be closer to God while doing everything that is pleasing to the Puritan religion. The name of the poem is based off of the daily tasks that were expected of Puritan housewives, like spinning and weaving.
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  • What is an idiom poem?

    Q: What is an idiom poem?

    A: "Idiom poem" is not a formal literary term or category. It is thus up to personal interpretation, but it could either be any poem that makes use of idioms as its central focus or any poem written in a non-standard dialect of a language.
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  • What is the candy cane poem?

    Q: What is the candy cane poem?

    A: The candy cane poem is a poem that is often used in religious settings to compare a candy cane to the sacrifice that Jesus made. It is often used at Christmas time to minister to children.
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  • Why did Walt Whitman use free verse?

    Q: Why did Walt Whitman use free verse?

    A: Some critics think Walt Whitman used free verse in a deliberate attempt to create a unique style of writing that blends journalism with music, oratory, and other cultural influences to transform American poetry. Other critics say his free verse voice was the result of a spiritual and revolutionary enlightenment. Most agree it was a combination of the two.
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  • What is a metrical romance poem?

    Q: What is a metrical romance poem?

    A: A metrical romance poem is a type of prose poem that was especially popular during the Renaissance. These poems do not rhyme and deal with themes such as love, rites of passage, chivalry, adventure and interpersonal relationships. Knights, fair maidens and epic journeys appear frequently in metrical romance poems.
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