Mythology

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Symbols for the Greek goddess Demeter include the cornucopia, wheat ears and a winged serpent. Other symbols that are associated with Demeter are symbols of the harvest, domesticated animals, some wild animals and plants.

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  • What did Aphrodite do?

    Q: What did Aphrodite do?

    A: Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and pleasure, is most famous for being chosen as the most beguiling of the goddesses by Paris. He awarded her a golden apple,which she later used to help Hippomenes win the race of Atalanta. As thanks to Paris, she awarded him the love of Helen of Troy, which ultimately led to the Trojan War.
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  • How many ancient Greek gods were there?

    Q: How many ancient Greek gods were there?

    A: When considering the original gods of Mount Olympus, there are a total of 12. The 12 original gods include Aphrodite, Zeus, Poseidon, Demeter, Artemis, Athena, Hera, Hestia, Pluto, Ares, Apollo and Hermes.
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  • Where do mermaids live?

    Q: Where do mermaids live?

    A: Mermaids are legendary fictional creatures said to live in the oceans of the world. They are characterized by having the upper body of a female human and the lower body of a fish.
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  • How did Atlantis sink?

    Q: How did Atlantis sink?

    A: According to the Greek philosopher Plato, Atlantis sank into the Atlantic ocean after the gods sent fire and earthquakes to the island. The gods were angry at the people of Atlantis for becoming greedy and pursuing immoral things.
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  • Is there evidence of vampires?

    Q: Is there evidence of vampires?

    A: There is no real evidence of supernatural, immortal, shape-shifting vampires, which are derived from popular media. However, there are certain groups and subcultures that attempt to cultivate vampire-like traits, including lifestyle vampires, sanguine vampires and psychopathic vampires.
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  • What was the physical description of Demeter?

    Q: What was the physical description of Demeter?

    A: The Greek goddess Demeter is portrayed as a mature woman, usually crowned and dressed in finery, and holding sheaves of wheat or barley. She is usually seated on a throne, and sometimes holds a cornucopia or the four-headed Eleusinian torch. In Homer's "Odyssey," she is described as blond-haired, though most depictions of her in art show dark, curly hair.
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  • What do dragons eat?

    Q: What do dragons eat?

    A: Dragons are legendary and fictional creatures that do not exist; therefore, they do not eat anything. However, within works of fiction and legends, they have an incredibly varied diet.
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  • Why was Poseidon important to the Greeks?

    Q: Why was Poseidon important to the Greeks?

    A: In Greek mythology, Poseidon was the god of the sea and protector of all water. The Greeks relied upon water for survival because it was crucial for food, shipping and trade, among other things. The thought was that if Poseidon was happy he would not wreak vengeance upon the Greeks. He was often worshipped by seamen who requested his protection while traveling on the water.
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  • What is the personality of Athena?

    Q: What is the personality of Athena?

    A: The Greek goddess Athena's personality is often portrayed as intelligent, watchful, reasoned and unemotional. She is the patron goddess of Athens, which was named for her. Athena's counterpart in Roman mythology is Minerva.
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  • What are some examples of legends?

    Q: What are some examples of legends?

    A: The lost city of Atlantis, King Arthur, and Robin Hood are prominent examples of legends. A legend is a story from the past of a significant person or event that is passed down by tradition and is unverifiable in its factual or historical basis.
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  • What is the mythological origin of the museum?

    Q: What is the mythological origin of the museum?

    A: The word "museum" comes from the Greek work "mouseion" which means seat of the Muses. In Greek mythology, the Muses are a collection of sister deities who provide inspiration to patrons of the arts and sciences. As the holding place for the great achievements of artistic and scientific endeavors, museums are closely related to the Muses.
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  • How many children did Zeus have?

    Q: How many children did Zeus have?

    A: Zeus had a total of 92 children by some counts, though not all counts agree. Of these 92, 41 were divine and 51 were mortal. However, since Zeus was a mythical god, there were conflicting accounts about whether certain beings were his offspring.
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  • How did Poseidon become the god of the sea?

    Q: How did Poseidon become the god of the sea?

    A: According to the "Iliad" of Homer, when the three sons of Cronus and Rhea divided up the world by lot, Zeus became the god of the sky, Hades became the god of the underworld, and Poseidon became the god of the sea. In Greek mythology, Poseidon was not only the god of the sea and water, but also of earthquakes and horses.
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  • What was Zeus' weapon of war?

    Q: What was Zeus' weapon of war?

    A: The mythological figure of Zeus, supreme ruler of the Greek gods, carried a thunderbolt as his weapon of war. It was given to him by the Cyclops to ward away evil.
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  • Who makes Zeus' lightning bolts?

    Q: Who makes Zeus' lightning bolts?

    A: According to ancient Greek historian Hesiod, Zeus' lighting bolts were made by Brontes, Steropes and Arges, the three Cyclopes sons of Uranus and Gaia. These one-eyed craftsmen also created Poseidon's trident and Hades' helm of darkness.
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  • What is Mother Nature?

    Q: What is Mother Nature?

    A: According to Reference.com, "Mother Nature is a common anthropomorphized representation of nature that focuses on the life-giving and nurturing features of nature by embodying it in the form of the mother." In prehistoric times, evidence points to many different religions worshiping Earth goddesses due to their association with agricultural bounty and fertility.
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  • What are some mythical lion names?

    Q: What are some mythical lion names?

    A: Mythological lion names include Yali, Maahes and Sekhmet. Yali is a lion from Hindu mythology. Sekhmet is an Egyptian goddess with the head of a lion, and Maahes is a lion god of war according to Egyptian mythology.
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  • What were Zeus' special powers?

    Q: What were Zeus' special powers?

    A: Zeus' powers enable him to summon rain, thunder, lightening and darkness. He is also able to hurl thunderbolts. In addition to being the ruler of the Olympians, he is known as the rain god.
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  • What do mermaids eat?

    Q: What do mermaids eat?

    A: Mermaids are mythical creatures that are said to live in water, so their mythical diet likely consists of seafood. Lobster, fish, crabs, shrimp, oysters and clams are protein sources. Seaweed may be another food they would eat.
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  • Where does Hera live?

    Q: Where does Hera live?

    A: The Greek goddess Hera lives on Mount Olympus. She is queen of the gods and is a member of the 12 most powerful gods in the pantheon. As the goddess of marriage and childbirth, she is the patroness of married women and goddesses.
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  • In Greek mythology, what are the major accomplishments of Poseidon?

    Q: In Greek mythology, what are the major accomplishments of Poseidon?

    A: Poseidon's infatuation with Demeter led to the creation of the horse. He built the impenetrable walls of Troy with the god Apollo. Poseidon unintentionally fathered many heroes, including Theseus, and many creatures, such as the Polyphemus and the Pegasus. Poseidon's accomplishments are usually results of his volatile moods and uncontrolled urges, such as his seduction of Medusa in Athena's temple, which caused Medusa to transform into a gorgon.
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