Literature

A:

According to an analysis on Cliffs Notes of "Leaves of Grass" by Walt Whitman, the three main themes are a celebration of his own individuality, an appreciation of America and democracy, and an expression of universal themes, such as birth, death and resurrection. For Whitman, democracy encompassed both the equal rights before the law of political democracy and the virtue of the individual of spiritual democracy.

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  • What Is Colonial Literature?

    Q: What Is Colonial Literature?

    A: Colonial literature is the body of creative work produced by the early American colonists. These works include the personal, emotional poetry of Anne Bradstreet, the jeremiads produced by preachers like Increase Mather and Jonathan Edwards, and the popular Indian captivity narratives.
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  • What Is a Literary Masterpiece?

    Q: What Is a Literary Masterpiece?

    A: A literary masterpiece is a work of literature that is considered to be outstanding in terms of its artistry and technique, and is held in high esteem as an original work to be read and studied. A literary masterpiece can take the form of any written work, including a poem, short story, play or novel.
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  • How Do You Write an Overview?

    Q: How Do You Write an Overview?

    A: Writing a project overview involves establishing the framework in which the project takes place, laying out the goals of the project, outlining the problems the project is designed to solve, summarizing the project and explaining the criteria for success. Project overviews are often critical elements of funding proposals, new program proposals or basic activity plans.
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  • What Does a "loss of Innocence" Mean in Literature?

    Q: What Does a "loss of Innocence" Mean in Literature?

    A: In literature, "loss of innocence" means that a character has ended her childhood and become an adult. This can happen in a variety of ways, and it can be symbolized throughout the text. One such example occurs in "Alice in Wonderland" when Alice struggles with boredom or with being an inconvenient size. Loss of innocence is also sometimes referred to as coming of age.
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  • What Are the Elements of a Mystery Story?

    Q: What Are the Elements of a Mystery Story?

    A: A mystery story has five essential elements, which include the characters, setting, plot, problem and solution. Separately, these are important, but they also must interact in a way that is logical and interesting for the reader.
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  • What Is William Shakespeare's Middle Name?

    Q: What Is William Shakespeare's Middle Name?

    A: William Shakespeare does not have a middle name of record. His birth is not even recorded. The first record of his life is his baptismal record, dated April 26, 1564, in which there is no mention of a middle name.
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  • Is There a Movie Version of the Book "Hatchet"?

    Q: Is There a Movie Version of the Book "Hatchet"?

    A: Gary Paulsen's book "Hatchet," the recipient of the 1988 Newbery Award, was adapted into the movie "A Cry in the Wild" in 1990. With a running time of 82 minutes, the film is available for purchase in DVD form via Amazon.
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  • What Are the Different Types of Novels?

    Q: What Are the Different Types of Novels?

    A: Novels, also termed "fiction," may be categorized as literary, mainstream or genre. Literary novels focus on characters' internal experiences and personal journeys. They are often critically acclaimed for both subject matter and writing style. Genre fiction follows a specific storytelling pattern, and mainstream novels appeal to a wide audience.
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  • What Is a Parallel Episode in Literature?

    Q: What Is a Parallel Episode in Literature?

    A: In literature, a parallel episode is a scene or chapter in which things that happened to a character earlier happen again in a different context or to a different character. An example is a character attending a baby shower before losing her own baby, then attending a second baby shower afterward. Parallel episodes are used to draw various types of contrasts.
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  • What Is the Purpose of Color Symbolism in "The Great Gatsby"?

    Q: What Is the Purpose of Color Symbolism in "The Great Gatsby"?

    A: The purpose of color symbolism in "The Great Gatsby" is to convey the different emotions of F. Scott Fitzgerald's characters and to depict the societal mindset of the time. While the book did not meet with success during the author's time, it has since gone on to be considered one of the greatest literary works in history.
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  • What Is a Summary of "Our Lady's Juggler" by Anatole France?

    Q: What Is a Summary of "Our Lady's Juggler" by Anatole France?

    A: "Our Lady's Juggler" is the story of Barnaby, who gave up his juggling trade to become a monk but was saddened by his inability to contribute to the artistic and literary life of the monastery. Barnaby decided to offer his juggling talent to Our Lady, the Virgin Mary, and her statue came to life for him. The story is a short parable recommending the virtues of humble simplicity.
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  • What Is a Linear Plot in Literature?

    Q: What Is a Linear Plot in Literature?

    A: In literature, a linear plot begins at a certain point, moves through a series of events to a climax and then ends up at another point. Also known as the plot structure of Aristotle, it is possible to represent a linear plot line with the drawing of an arc. The primary advantage of using a linear plot is that the reader knows, or at least has an idea, of where the plot goes next, and the reader is guaranteed to get a beginning and ending.
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  • What Is a Narrative Summary?

    Q: What Is a Narrative Summary?

    A: As the name implies, a narrative summary provides a brief, succinct summary including the plot, characters, conflict and themes from the point of view of the person writing the summary. Even though the summary itself has a narrative form, this type of summary applies to different types of writing including biography, essays and literature. In a way, it means that the summarizer tells a story in the summary.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Fiction and Non-Fiction?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Fiction and Non-Fiction?

    A: While the basic idea of fiction as fake and non-fiction as truth hold true for all genres, there are some that fall toward the middle of the strict contrast. For example, creative non-fiction involves real events, but details are often exaggerated for dramatic effect. Memoirs can fall under both fiction and non-fiction, depending on how rooted in truth is in the story.
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  • What Are Littering Articles?

    Q: What Are Littering Articles?

    A: Littering articles are stories that discuss litter, a major pollution problem. To "litter" means "to throw things on the ground and leave them there", as opposed to disposing of them.
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  • Why Was "Killing Mr. Griffin" Banned?

    Q: Why Was "Killing Mr. Griffin" Banned?

    A: "Killing Mr. Griffin," a young adult novel by Lois Duncan, has been banned by a number of schools and other institutions for its macabre plot involving several high school students kidnapping a teacher who dies before they decide to free him. The book was originally published in 1978.
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  • Where Can I Find Short Moral Stories?

    Q: Where Can I Find Short Moral Stories?

    A: A fable is a short story with a moral that has animals as the main characters. A parable is a short moral story without animals as characters. Fables and morals have been around for centuries, but modern moral stories, such as "Fables of Our Time" by James Thurber, also exist.
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  • What Are Some "birthday in Heaven" Quotes?

    Q: What Are Some "birthday in Heaven" Quotes?

    A: Some birthday in heaven quotes are, "If I could send a birthday card to Heaven/I would write down all the thank you's never said," "It's your birthday up in heaven/And I'm wondering what you'll do" and "Hope this special day in heaven is incredible/Because I'm sending you lots of love and hugs." Birthday in heaven poems and quotes wish a happy birthday to a loved one who has passed away.
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  • What Is a Personal Fable?

    Q: What Is a Personal Fable?

    A: According to About.com, the term "personal fable" is used to describe an egocentric belief commonly held by adolescents that one is highly unique and unlike any other who has ever walked the Earth. This belief is generally seen as a normal part of adolescent cognitive development, but its downfall is that it sometimes causes teens to take risks because they believe that nothing bad could possibly happen.
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  • What Is Author Purpose?

    Q: What Is Author Purpose?

    A: The author's purpose is the main reason or reasons why an author writes about a particular topic. Authors bring out their purpose through different sorts of writing formats, genres and languages. An author's purpose can be to persuade or convince, inform or entertain the readers.
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  • What Are Some Examples of Fantasy Last Names?

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Fantasy Last Names?

    A: Examples of fantasy last names are Dragonhilt, Screamlock, Shadeworm or Banewind. Surnames can be race-specific, such as Dwarven names like Bristlehorn, Boulderforge and Coalback. For names with a medieval tone, choose names like Rotbertus, Hermannus or Guillemot. Diabolical characters can have surnames like Denholm, Darkmore or Gnash.
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