Folklore

A:

According to ancient Greek historian Hesiod, Zeus' lighting bolts were made by Brontes, Steropes and Arges, the three Cyclopes sons of Uranus and Gaia. These one-eyed craftsmen also created Poseidon's trident and Hades' helm of darkness.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What are traditional tales?

    Q: What are traditional tales?

    A: Traditional tales are stories that are passed down orally as part of the shared tradition of a culture. Traditional tales include myths, folk tales and legends. These tales often include fantasy elements and metaphorical lessons.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who wrote the book "Cinderella"?

    Q: Who wrote the book "Cinderella"?

    A: Cinderella was written and published under the name "The Little Glass Slipper" in 1697 by Frenchman Charles Perrault. In 1812, the Brothers Grimm published the story in their famous book of fairy tales.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does "Wednesday's child is full of woe" mean?

    Q: What does "Wednesday's child is full of woe" mean?

    A: The line "Wednesday's child is full of woe" is a part of a nursery rhyme known as "Monday's Child," sometimes attributed to Mother Goose; it predicts that children born on Wednesday are sad.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Do werewolves really exist?

    Q: Do werewolves really exist?

    A: There is no credible scientific information to date that supports the existence of werewolves. Many scholars who study the history of werewolves disagree among themselves about what exactly a werewolf is, making it harder still to prove or disprove their existence.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What color was Santa's suit originally?

    Q: What color was Santa's suit originally?

    A: Researchers at the BBC insist that the red and white of Santa's suit has been around for quite some time. Some people have stated that Santa's original suit was a more subdued hue similar to tan.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?

    Q: What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?

    A: According to MSN Entertainment, the poetic character Frosty the Snowman was brought to life by a magic silk hat. The hat belonged to a magician named Professor Hinkle, who was hired to perform magic tricks for bored students.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How did superstitions start?

    Q: How did superstitions start?

    A: Sarah Albert at WebMD says that superstitions start when a ritual or belief is given magical significance. For instance, if a woman believes that a black cat crossing her path means she has to go back home and start over or suffer bad luck, she follows a superstition. Superstitions spread when they "work," and other people repeat them.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the moral lesson of the story about the rabbit and turtle race?

    Q: What is the moral lesson of the story about the rabbit and turtle race?

    A: The moral of the story "The Tortoise and the Hare" is that the weakest opponent should never be underestimated. In the story, the rabbit is beat by the turtle in a race because he took a nap and underestimated the turtle's ability to pass him up.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the source of conflict in the short story "Rip Van Winkle"?

    Q: What is the source of conflict in the short story "Rip Van Winkle"?

    A: The central conflict of "Rip Van Winkle" involves competing visions of American society following the Revolution. In the story, Washington Irving reveals an America falling short of its romanticized vision. He presents this symbolically through the journey of his title character, Rip.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can vampires have babies?

    Q: Can vampires have babies?

    A: According to folklore, a male vampire can father children with a living woman. Sometimes known as dhampirs, such children exhibit unusual tastes for blood, and some have advanced hearing, smell and taste.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some American folklore legends?

    Q: What are some American folklore legends?

    A: American folklore legends come from several media, including oral traditions, ballads, literature and historical mythology. The most-famous legends often center around mythic figures such as Paul Bunyan, Casey Jones or John Henry. They occasionally involve monstrous creatures as well, such as prehistoric entities like Bigfoot, the Jersey Devil or the cryptozoological mystery of Champ, the beast of Lake Champlain.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How many Knights of the Round Table were there?

    Q: How many Knights of the Round Table were there?

    A: Depending on the tradition one reads, besides Arthur there were between 12 knights and over 1,600. The most commonly accepted number, however, is the 25 knights shown on the Winchester Round Table.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the nationality of Santa Claus?

    Q: What is the nationality of Santa Claus?

    A: According to the St. Nicholas Center, the persona of Santa Claus is loosely based on St. Nicholas, a bishop in Myra, Turkey who became the patron saint of children. Primarily through Dutch settlers celebrating his feast day, St. Nicholas became known as "Santa Claus" over time.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is there a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow?

    Q: Why is there a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow?

    A: In Irish mythology, the pot of gold is hidden at the end of a rainbow by a small member of the fairy family called the leprechaun. Humans who are lucky enough to spot a leprechaun by following the rainbow may still have problems catching him because the fairies bestowed upon leprechauns the magical ability to disappear.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How did Odysseus show his bravery?

    Q: How did Odysseus show his bravery?

    A: Odysseus showed his bravery by fighting valiantly in the war with Troy, facing great dangers on his decade-long voyage home and ridding his home of his wife's parasitical suitors upon his return. During his lengthy ordeal after incurring Poseidon's wrath, he had many opportunities to demonstrate his resourcefulness, cunning and courage.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is Santa's real name?

    Q: What is Santa's real name?

    A: Santa's real name is Saint Nicholas. He was a monk who lived around 280 A.D. in the area now known as Turkey. He was admired for his kindness and became the subject of legends.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who wrote the first Robin Hood story?

    Q: Who wrote the first Robin Hood story?

    A: Around 1377, the poem "Piers Plowman," by William Langland, made a passing reference to a character thought to be Robin Hood. A tale known as "Robin Hood and the Monk" was written about 1450, but the author is unknown.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    A: The moral to the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" is that children must obey their parents and that they must never talk to strangers. Even a very friendly stranger is capable of having bad intentions.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where does the story of Cinderella take place?

    Q: Where does the story of Cinderella take place?

    A: The geographical location of the kingdom in which Cinderella lives is not established in any of the known versions of the fairy tale. Since there are over 345 variants of the story from different times and cultures, it is difficult to infer where the original kingdom may have been located.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife"?

    Q: What is the moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife"?

    A: The moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife" is that a person must be thankful for what he has and not always want more, lest it become impossible for him ever to be satisfied. Those who do not appreciate the small things likely do not have the capacity to appreciate anything and are destined to live a life deprived of joy.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How are fairies and pixies different?

    Q: How are fairies and pixies different?

    A: Pixies and fairies are both types of mythical creatures in human folklore and literature, but fairies derive from locations around the world, while pixies are considered beings native to Northern Europe, particularly England and the Scandinavian countries. Pixies and fairies appear in many books, works of art and even television shows and movies. Pixies and fairies are typically shown as minuscule creatures, but have different physical characteristics that set them apart.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: