Folklore

A:

Hansel and Gretel is the story of two German children who discover a house made of confections in the woods near their house. The candy house is inhabited by a witch who feeds the children sweets so she can cook and eat them. When Gretel is asked to light the fire in order to cook Hansel, she pushes the witch into the oven instead and slams the door.

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  • What is the moral of "Cinderella"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Cinderella"?

    A: The moral of "Cinderella" is that people should always fight for what they want with a good heart and hard work. Cinderella is never negative or angry due to how poorly her stepsisters and stepmother treat her, and she keeps working hard despite things seeming hopeless.
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  • How are fairies and pixies different?

    Q: How are fairies and pixies different?

    A: Pixies and fairies are both types of mythical creatures in human folklore and literature, but fairies derive from locations around the world, while pixies are considered beings native to Northern Europe, particularly England and the Scandinavian countries. Pixies and fairies appear in many books, works of art and even television shows and movies. Pixies and fairies are typically shown as minuscule creatures, but have different physical characteristics that set them apart.
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  • What is an example of a fable?

    Q: What is an example of a fable?

    A: An example of a fable would be "The Ant and the Grasshopper," by the Greek fabulist Aesop. A fable is a short fictional story, often containing elements such as anthropomorphic animals, written for the benefit of a concluding maxim or moral.
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  • What is the blue corn moon in the movie "Pocahontas?"

    Q: What is the blue corn moon in the movie "Pocahontas?"

    A: The blue corn moon referred to in the song "Colors of the Wind" from "Pocahontas" is a fictitious concept and does not refer to any particular moon phase. The concepts of blue moon and full corn moon do exist and refer to different types of full moons occurring at various times of the year.
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  • How can you become healthy according to old wives' tales?

    Q: How can you become healthy according to old wives' tales?

    A: Many old wives' tales exist that promise benefits of better health or to cure an ailment. In some cases, these tales are at least partially true. Common old wives' tales include those related to eyesight, joints and muscular health, and some claim to reduce doctor's visits and keep children free from disease.
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  • How long do vampires live?

    Q: How long do vampires live?

    A: Vampires are purported to live forever, barring any type of attempt to kill them. Legend has it that a vampire can only be killed if it's stabbed through the heart with a stake, shot through the heart with a silver bullet, burned, beheaded or exposed to sunlight, although vampires are also intolerant of garlic, holy water and crucifixes.
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  • What is a legendary hero?

    Q: What is a legendary hero?

    A: A legendary hero is a character immortalized in myths and folk tales, who is famous for acts of courage and bravery. Heracles, also known as Hercules, is an example of a legendary hero from Greek mythology, and Paul Bunyan is a legendary hero originating from American folk stories.
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  • Why do we say "silly goose"?

    Q: Why do we say "silly goose"?

    A: The expression “silly goose” refers to a person who acts in a childish, foolish but somewhat comical way. This term originates from several sources. The entry in the Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states, “A foolish or ignorant person is called a goose because of the alleged stupidity of this bird." The Samuel Johnson dictionary describes geese as, “Large waterfowl proverbially noted, I know not why, for foolishness."
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  • What is the nationality of Santa Claus?

    Q: What is the nationality of Santa Claus?

    A: According to the St. Nicholas Center, the persona of Santa Claus is loosely based on St. Nicholas, a bishop in Myra, Turkey who became the patron saint of children. Primarily through Dutch settlers celebrating his feast day, St. Nicholas became known as "Santa Claus" over time.
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  • Can vampires have babies?

    Q: Can vampires have babies?

    A: According to folklore, a male vampire can father children with a living woman. Sometimes known as dhampirs, such children exhibit unusual tastes for blood, and some have advanced hearing, smell and taste.
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  • What is the story of "Swan Lake" about?

    Q: What is the story of "Swan Lake" about?

    A: The tragic love story of "Swan Lake" is about a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. During the day she must swim as a swan in a lake of tears. At night she may be human again, but her spell can only be broken by a virgin prince who swears his eternal fidelity to her.
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  • How did Odysseus show his bravery?

    Q: How did Odysseus show his bravery?

    A: Odysseus showed his bravery by fighting valiantly in the war with Troy, facing great dangers on his decade-long voyage home and ridding his home of his wife's parasitical suitors upon his return. During his lengthy ordeal after incurring Poseidon's wrath, he had many opportunities to demonstrate his resourcefulness, cunning and courage.
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  • What is the Lizzie Borden nursery rhyme?

    Q: What is the Lizzie Borden nursery rhyme?

    A: The rhyme based on Lizzie Borden and the murder of her parents is: "Lizzie Borden took an axe, And gave her mother forty whacks; When she saw what she had done, She gave her father forty-one," as cited by History.com.
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  • Who wrote the first Robin Hood story?

    Q: Who wrote the first Robin Hood story?

    A: Around 1377, the poem "Piers Plowman," by William Langland, made a passing reference to a character thought to be Robin Hood. A tale known as "Robin Hood and the Monk" was written about 1450, but the author is unknown.
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  • Has anyone ever been raised by wolves?

    Q: Has anyone ever been raised by wolves?

    A: There are many accounts of people being raised by wolves, as well as other animals. Cases exist of people being raised by monkeys, wild dogs and even wild cats. Some people have been protected by animals as if they were a part of their pack for days, weeks, even years.
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  • What should a vampire look like?

    Q: What should a vampire look like?

    A: While there is some variation depending on tradition, vampires usually are described as looking like ordinary people but with very pale skin that becomes flushed with the consumption of blood. Sometimes the lips and mouth of a vampire are described as red or bloodstained. This appearance is explained by LiveScience as a normal effect of decomposition.
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  • How do eagles renew their youth?

    Q: How do eagles renew their youth?

    A: There is a claim that eagles can renew their lives by biting off their feathers, talons and beaks and then regrowing them, but this is not true. The myth states that when eagles reach the age of 30, their physical condition critically deteriorates. By plucking out their bad feathers and beak, they are supposedly able to live another 40 years. This myth stems partially from a metaphor in the Bible.
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  • What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

    Q: What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

    A: In the original text of "Jack and the Beanstalk," the name of the giant is not given. However, most plays that are based on the story have the giant named Blunderbore. The giant goes by similar names in other versions of the story, including Blunderboar, Thunderbore, Blunderbus and Blunderbuss.
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  • Where does the story of Cinderella take place?

    Q: Where does the story of Cinderella take place?

    A: The geographical location of the kingdom in which Cinderella lives is not established in any of the known versions of the fairy tale. Since there are over 345 variants of the story from different times and cultures, it is difficult to infer where the original kingdom may have been located.
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  • What is the moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife"?

    Q: What is the moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife"?

    A: The moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife" is that a person must be thankful for what he has and not always want more, lest it become impossible for him ever to be satisfied. Those who do not appreciate the small things likely do not have the capacity to appreciate anything and are destined to live a life deprived of joy.
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  • What is the moral of "Rip Van Winkle"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Rip Van Winkle"?

    A: The moral of "Rip Van Winkle" is that life passes by with or without a person and that change is inevitable. The story also shows that a person will pay dearly when they try to avoid change; in many ways, Irving is asking his readers to be active participants in their own lives and enjoy each moment.
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