Folklore

A:

Various interpretation of the moral of "Rapunzel" concern the inevitability of the life cycle and procreation. Other interpretations of the story focus on the struggle of the young against the old, according to SurLaLune Fairy Tales.

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  • What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    A: The moral to the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" is that children must obey their parents and that they must never talk to strangers. Even a very friendly stranger is capable of having bad intentions.
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  • What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

    Q: What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

    A: In the original text of "Jack and the Beanstalk," the name of the giant is not given. However, most plays that are based on the story have the giant named Blunderbore. The giant goes by similar names in other versions of the story, including Blunderboar, Thunderbore, Blunderbus and Blunderbuss.
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  • What is the best way to wish someone good luck?

    Q: What is the best way to wish someone good luck?

    A: Wishing someone good luck on their future endeavors is a friendly and polite gesture that can be done in a variety of ways, preferably by sending a handwritten note. The note may be accompanied by wishing the recipient well either in person or on the phone, depending on the relationship to him or her.
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  • What is the moral of "Rip Van Winkle"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Rip Van Winkle"?

    A: The moral of "Rip Van Winkle" is that life passes by with or without a person and that change is inevitable. The story also shows that a person will pay dearly when they try to avoid change; in many ways, Irving is asking his readers to be active participants in their own lives and enjoy each moment.
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  • What is the source of conflict in the short story "Rip Van Winkle"?

    Q: What is the source of conflict in the short story "Rip Van Winkle"?

    A: The central conflict of "Rip Van Winkle" involves competing visions of American society following the Revolution. In the story, Washington Irving reveals an America falling short of its romanticized vision. He presents this symbolically through the journey of his title character, Rip.
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  • What is the legend of the gingerbread man?

    Q: What is the legend of the gingerbread man?

    A: The legend of the gingerbread man exists in many forms, but it always consists of an animate, humanoid gingerbread cookie who is forced to flee from creatures who wish to eat him. The gingerbread man encounters many creatures but is ultimately tricked and eaten by a cunning fox.
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  • Why is there a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow?

    Q: Why is there a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow?

    A: In Irish mythology, the pot of gold is hidden at the end of a rainbow by a small member of the fairy family called the leprechaun. Humans who are lucky enough to spot a leprechaun by following the rainbow may still have problems catching him because the fairies bestowed upon leprechauns the magical ability to disappear.
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  • What are the names of Snow White's seven dwarfs?

    Q: What are the names of Snow White's seven dwarfs?

    A: The seven dwarfs in the classic Disney film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" are Bashful, Doc, Dopey, Happy, Sleepy, Sneezy and Grumpy. The other main characters in the film include Snow White who is the kind and gentle princess who lives with the seven dwarfs, as well as the Evil Queen, the Prince, the Huntsman and the Magic Mirror.
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  • What is an example of a fable?

    Q: What is an example of a fable?

    A: An example of a fable would be "The Ant and the Grasshopper," by the Greek fabulist Aesop. A fable is a short fictional story, often containing elements such as anthropomorphic animals, written for the benefit of a concluding maxim or moral.
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  • What is the summary of "Hansel and Gretel"?

    Q: What is the summary of "Hansel and Gretel"?

    A: Hansel and Gretel is the story of two German children who discover a house made of confections in the woods near their house. The candy house is inhabited by a witch who feeds the children sweets so she can cook and eat them. When Gretel is asked to light the fire in order to cook Hansel, she pushes the witch into the oven instead and slams the door.
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  • How long do vampires live?

    Q: How long do vampires live?

    A: Vampires are purported to live forever, barring any type of attempt to kill them. Legend has it that a vampire can only be killed if it's stabbed through the heart with a stake, shot through the heart with a silver bullet, burned, beheaded or exposed to sunlight, although vampires are also intolerant of garlic, holy water and crucifixes.
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  • Why is an owl a bad omen?

    Q: Why is an owl a bad omen?

    A: The role of an owl as a bad omen stretches back to ancient mythology in a number of cultures. Many cultures believe that owls signal an underworld, represent death or human spirits after death. Owls are not, however, universal omens.
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  • Can vampires have babies?

    Q: Can vampires have babies?

    A: According to folklore, a male vampire can father children with a living woman. Sometimes known as dhampirs, such children exhibit unusual tastes for blood, and some have advanced hearing, smell and taste.
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  • What is Santa's real name?

    Q: What is Santa's real name?

    A: Santa's real name is Saint Nicholas. He was a monk who lived around 280 A.D. in the area now known as Turkey. He was admired for his kindness and became the subject of legends.
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  • What is the moral of "Cinderella"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Cinderella"?

    A: The moral of "Cinderella" is that people should always fight for what they want with a good heart and hard work. Cinderella is never negative or angry due to how poorly her stepsisters and stepmother treat her, and she keeps working hard despite things seeming hopeless.
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  • What is the moral of Rapunzel?

    Q: What is the moral of Rapunzel?

    A: Various interpretation of the moral of "Rapunzel" concern the inevitability of the life cycle and procreation. Other interpretations of the story focus on the struggle of the young against the old, according to SurLaLune Fairy Tales.
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  • How can you become healthy according to old wives' tales?

    Q: How can you become healthy according to old wives' tales?

    A: Many old wives' tales exist that promise benefits of better health or to cure an ailment. In some cases, these tales are at least partially true. Common old wives' tales include those related to eyesight, joints and muscular health, and some claim to reduce doctor's visits and keep children free from disease.
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  • What is the story of "Swan Lake" about?

    Q: What is the story of "Swan Lake" about?

    A: The tragic love story of "Swan Lake" is about a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. During the day she must swim as a swan in a lake of tears. At night she may be human again, but her spell can only be broken by a virgin prince who swears his eternal fidelity to her.
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  • Why do we say "silly goose"?

    Q: Why do we say "silly goose"?

    A: The expression “silly goose” refers to a person who acts in a childish, foolish but somewhat comical way. This term originates from several sources. The entry in the Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states, “A foolish or ignorant person is called a goose because of the alleged stupidity of this bird." The Samuel Johnson dictionary describes geese as, “Large waterfowl proverbially noted, I know not why, for foolishness."
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  • What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?

    Q: What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?

    A: According to MSN Entertainment, the poetic character Frosty the Snowman was brought to life by a magic silk hat. The hat belonged to a magician named Professor Hinkle, who was hired to perform magic tricks for bored students.
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  • What are traditional tales?

    Q: What are traditional tales?

    A: Traditional tales are stories that are passed down orally as part of the shared tradition of a culture. Traditional tales include myths, folk tales and legends. These tales often include fantasy elements and metaphorical lessons.
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