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In the novel "The Great Gatsby," the character Jay Gatsby owns a mansion that took him 3 years to save the necessary funds to purchase. It's estimated that he bought the home in 1922.

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  • What Is the Theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf?

    Q: What Is the Theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf?

    A: The theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf is the treasure of love. The tone of the story is lighthearted and playful.
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  • What Did Melville Do When He Was 21?

    Q: What Did Melville Do When He Was 21?

    A: In 1841, at the age of 21, Herman Melville began his second voyage aboard a merchant ship. His voyage on the whaler Acushnet took him from Massachusetts around Cape Horn to the South Pacific Ocean.
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  • What Is Gatsby and Daisy's Relationship?

    Q: What Is Gatsby and Daisy's Relationship?

    A: Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby are lovers in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby." The relationship between the two characters forms the primary plot of the novel.
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  • In "Julius Caesar," Why Does Calpurnia Want Caesar to Stay Home?

    Q: In "Julius Caesar," Why Does Calpurnia Want Caesar to Stay Home?

    A: In William Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar," Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, begs him to stay home because she dreamed of his murder. At this point in the play, Act 2, Scene 2, Brutus and other Roman senators have decided to murder Caesar when he comes to the Capitol.
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  • Who Suspects Macbeth of the Murders?

    Q: Who Suspects Macbeth of the Murders?

    A: In Act 3, Scene 1 of the play "Macbeth," written by William Shakespeare, Banquo becomes suspicious that Macbeth is responsible for Duncan's murder. During this scene, Macbeth becomes fearful of Banquo's suspicions.
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  • What Themes Are Expressed in "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde?

    Q: What Themes Are Expressed in "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde?

    A: Themes expressed in "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde include sacrifice, mercy, repression, compassion, love, poverty and riches. The fairy tale focuses on the statue of the Happy Prince who watches over a town and weeps as some townsfolk suffer in poverty.
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  • What Is the Book Summary of Black Beauty?

    Q: What Is the Book Summary of Black Beauty?

    A: The book "Black Beauty" is an autobiographical story told from the perspective of Black Beauty: the main character who is a spirited stallion. "Black Beauty" tells the story of Black Beauty’s life in several phases, beginning with his birth then journeying through his life as a foal, a yearling and ultimately as a mature stallion.
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  • How Did Shakespeare Become Famous?

    Q: How Did Shakespeare Become Famous?

    A: Within two years of writing his first play, "Henry VI, Part One," which put him on London's theatrical map, Williams Shakespeare was so famous that established playwright Robert Greene referred to him as an "upstart crow" in a critique of his work. Shakespeare wrote "Henry VI, Part One" while still living in his native Stratford. Shortly thereafter, he moved to London to continue writing plays as well as acting.
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  • What Happens at the End of Macbeth?

    Q: What Happens at the End of Macbeth?

    A: At the end of Macbeth, Lady Macbeth commits suicide, Macduff kills Macbeth and Malcolm is hailed King of Scotland. Throughout the 11 scenes in Act V, Macbeth and his wife show that their sanity has been compromised while Macduff, Malcolm and an English-Scottish coalition prepare to war against the castle. Macbeth exceedingly relies on the Weird Sisters' predictions regarding his future, and Lady Macbeth begins sleepwalking as guilt torments her.
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  • What Are Some Examples of Irony in "Lord of the Flies?"

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Irony in "Lord of the Flies?"

    A: William Golding's novel "Lord of the Flies" has many examples of irony, several of which are rooted in statements the young boys make about order and culture, which they later fail to uphold. One of the most obviously ironic quotes comes from the violent antagonist Jack who, early in the book, states, "We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages."
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  • What Were the Rules of Courtship in Othello?

    Q: What Were the Rules of Courtship in Othello?

    A: The rules of courtship in Othello involved keeping a relationship secret, using others to communicate between lovers, giving small gifts as tokens of affection, and giving a more special gift as a secret symbol of engagement. Many of the courtship rules in the time in which Othello was written were offshoots of older medieval traditions.
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  • What Is an Example of Dramatic Irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    Q: What Is an Example of Dramatic Irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    A: An example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare is when Caesar is warned about the Ides of March by the soothsayer. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something that the character does not know. In this scene, the audience recognizes that the Ides of March is the day Caesar dies, but Caesar himself does not know this and ignores the warning, which results in his death.
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  • What Is the Definition of a Shakespearean Tragedy?

    Q: What Is the Definition of a Shakespearean Tragedy?

    A: A Shakespearean tragedy is defined as a play written by William Shakespeare that tells the story of a seemingly heroic figure whose major character flaw causes the story to end with his tragic downfall. Shakespeare wrote 10 plays that are classified as “Shakespearean tragedies,” including "Hamlet" and "Macbeth."
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  • What Are Examples of Asides in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    Q: What Are Examples of Asides in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A: Romeo speaks an aside in Act II, Scene ii of "Romeo and Juliet" when he is standing beneath the balcony where Juliet is speaking, unaware that anyone hears her. Juliet is professing her love for Romeo, and he says "Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?"
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  • What Is Macbeth's Tragic Flaw?

    Q: What Is Macbeth's Tragic Flaw?

    A: Macbeth's tragic flaw is his ambition. He is willing to do anything it takes to become the king, and his wife encourages his evil deeds.
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  • Who Wrote "The Arabian Nights"?

    Q: Who Wrote "The Arabian Nights"?

    A: "OneThousand and One Nights," also called "The Arabian Nights," is a compilation of folk tales of Middle Eastern and Indian decent whose original authors are unknown. There are numerous versions of "The Arabian Nights," with some of the most popular translations completed by Sir Richard Francis Burton, Joseph-Charles Mardus and Edward Lane. Many scholars believe that the original tales date back as far as the ninth century.
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  • How Many Times Is Love Mentioned in the Bible?

    Q: How Many Times Is Love Mentioned in the Bible?

    A: The number of times that love is mentioned in the Bible depends on the version of the Bible. In the King James Version, love is mentioned 310 times, 131 times in the Old Testament and 179 times in the New Testament.
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  • What Are the Names of the Ghosts in "A Christmas Carol"?

    Q: What Are the Names of the Ghosts in "A Christmas Carol"?

    A: The three ghosts named in "A Christmas Carol" are the ghosts or spirits of Christmas past, present, and future. These three ghosts tell Ebenezer Scrooge of his future if he does not change his ways.
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  • Why Did Thoreau Leave Walden Pond?

    Q: Why Did Thoreau Leave Walden Pond?

    A: In his book, "Walden; or Life in the Woods," American naturalist and author Henry David Thoreau explained that he left his life at Walden Pond after two years and two months because he felt he could not afford to spend more time there. From Walden Pond, Thoreau moved back to Concord, N.H.
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  • Why Do We Need to Study Philippine Literature?

    Q: Why Do We Need to Study Philippine Literature?

    A: While most Philippine literature was written under the significant influence of the occupying Spanish powers during the 1800s, there is also a viable body of work written in the 20th and 21st centuries that makes an important contribution to world literature, which makes it a worthwhile culture to analyze. Philippine literature includes poetry, metrical romances, educational and religious prose, religious and secular drama and modern nationalist literature.
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  • What Is the Relationship Between Harry Potter and the NEWTs?

    Q: What Is the Relationship Between Harry Potter and the NEWTs?

    A: Because Harry Potter did not attend Hogwarts for his seventh and final year, he did not take the N.E.W.T.s, which are the exams young wizards about to graduate must take before finishing school. J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter novels, has given no indication that Harry ever returned to Hogwarts to finish his final year, though she has said that Hermione Granger did so.
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