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A:

William Shakespeare was inspired to write "Romeo and Juliet" by a poem titled "Romeus and Juliet" by Arthur Brooks. In fact, Shakespeare's play shares many of the details of Brooks' poem. The story, however, was a commonly told one throughout Europe and was not unique to Brooks either.

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  • What Reason Does Macbeth Give for Killing Duncan's Two Guards?

    Q: What Reason Does Macbeth Give for Killing Duncan's Two Guards?

    A: Macbeth kills the two drunken guards in a rage, claiming that it was them that had killed King Duncan, as they were covered in the king's blood. This happens in Act II, Scene III in William Shakespeare's tragedy, "Macbeth."
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  • Why Do We Need to Study Philippine Literature?

    Q: Why Do We Need to Study Philippine Literature?

    A: While most Philippine literature was written under the significant influence of the occupying Spanish powers during the 1800s, there is also a viable body of work written in the 20th and 21st centuries that makes an important contribution to world literature, which makes it a worthwhile culture to analyze. Philippine literature includes poetry, metrical romances, educational and religious prose, religious and secular drama and modern nationalist literature.
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  • How Did William Shakespeare Die?

    Q: How Did William Shakespeare Die?

    A: The exact cause of William Shakespeare's death is not known, but many historians believe that he fell victim to an outbreak of typhus that took England by storm in 1616. That is the same year that Shakespeare died.
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  • What Is the Setting of the "Most Dangerous Game"?

    Q: What Is the Setting of the "Most Dangerous Game"?

    A: The setting of "The Most Dangerous Game" is in the Caribbean on both a Brazil-bound yacht as well as a dangerous and mysterious Caribbean island. The action of the short story takes place soon after World War I.
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  • What Is the Name of the Boat in "Moby Dick"?

    Q: What Is the Name of the Boat in "Moby Dick"?

    A: The name of the boat in "Moby Dick" is the Pequod, which is also the name of a Native American tribe that lived in the northeastern United States.
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  • What Are Examples of Asides in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    Q: What Are Examples of Asides in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A: Romeo speaks an aside in Act II, Scene ii of "Romeo and Juliet" when he is standing beneath the balcony where Juliet is speaking, unaware that anyone hears her. Juliet is professing her love for Romeo, and he says "Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?"
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  • What Are Some Examples of Simile in "Julius Caesar"?

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Simile in "Julius Caesar"?

    A: A simile is a comparison using "like " or "as." One of the most famous similes in William Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar" comes in Act 1, Scene 2, when Cassius compares Julius Caesar to a huge statue, or Colossus, that straddles the "narrow world." The play has many other similes, as well.
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  • What Were Shakespeare's Occupations?

    Q: What Were Shakespeare's Occupations?

    A: In addition to being an actor, playwright, and entrepreneur, it is thought that Shakespeare may have also worked as a horse attendant and assistant schoolmaster. There are several years of Shakespeare's life for which there is no existing account, and scholars merely speculate on his occupation during those years, notes Biograph.com.
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  • Why Does Lady Macbeth Pray to Be "unsexed"?

    Q: Why Does Lady Macbeth Pray to Be "unsexed"?

    A: Lady Macbeth prays to be "unsexed" because she is preparing to help Macbeth kill Duncan, in order to take control of the Scottish throne. She associates her womanhood with a warm, nurturing spirit, and prays to rid herself of those qualities so that she might help commit the murder.
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  • How Many Books Has C.S. Lewis Written?

    Q: How Many Books Has C.S. Lewis Written?

    A: Writer Clive Staples (C.S.) Lewis composed 74 books, including several essay collections published after his death. Lewis is best known for his fictional work, particularly "The Chronicles of Narnia," though most of Lewis' books are nonfiction works.
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  • What Is the Moral of the Story "Aladdin"?

    Q: What Is the Moral of the Story "Aladdin"?

    A: A moral of the story of Aladdin as portrayed in the 1992 Walt Disney movie of the same name teaches that dishonesty does more harm than good in the long-term. According to Movie Guide, the fundamental lesson of the movie is one should remain true to self, accurately representing oneself without pretensions. Another related moral lesson to be learned from "Aladdin" is that personal self-worth trumps external riches.
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  • What Is Gatsby and Daisy's Relationship?

    Q: What Is Gatsby and Daisy's Relationship?

    A: Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby are lovers in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby." The relationship between the two characters forms the primary plot of the novel.
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  • What Is Voltaire Famous For?

    Q: What Is Voltaire Famous For?

    A: Voltaire, born François-Marie Arouet, was one of the most famous of French enlightenment thinkers or philosophers. As an author, Voltaire worked in a variety of different media, including novels, short stories, plays, essays, poetry and pamphlets. His most famous work is likely the scathing satire, "Candide," subtitled "Optimism."
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  • How Many Books Did Edgar Allan Poe Write?

    Q: How Many Books Did Edgar Allan Poe Write?

    A: According to the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe published in his lifetime one novel and three collections of his tales. His vast literary contributions include poems, stories, essays, sketches and letters.
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  • Is "The Scarlet Letter" a Protofeminist Novel?

    Q: Is "The Scarlet Letter" a Protofeminist Novel?

    A: "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1850, is considered protofeminist as the story features feminist themes before the concept of feminism was known. The concept of feminism was not known prior to the 20th century.
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  • What Is Dante's Most Famous Work About?

    Q: What Is Dante's Most Famous Work About?

    A: Dante Alighieri's most famous work, "Divine Comedy," is about the poet's journey through Hell, Purgatory and finally Paradise. Along the way, he and his guides encounter a number of famous historical figures, including people from Dante's own time as well as Brutus and Cassius, the assassins of Julius Caesar; Saint Peter; Thomas Aquinas and others. The poem is a metaphor for the progress of a soul toward God.
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  • What Is the Theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf?

    Q: What Is the Theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf?

    A: The theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf is the treasure of love. The tone of the story is lighthearted and playful.
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  • What Is a Moral Tale?

    Q: What Is a Moral Tale?

    A: A moral or morality tale is a type of story, popular during the 15th and 16th centuries, that uses allegory to portray the struggle between good and evil, often culminating in a lesson. Typically, morality tales featured personifications or avatars of vices and virtues.
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  • What Is a Short Summary of "Black Beauty?"

    Q: What Is a Short Summary of "Black Beauty?"

    A: Anna Sewell's 1877 novel "Black Beauty" is an autobiographical memoir told by the horse who gives the book its name that starts with the horse's whimsical days as a young colt before moving on toward tough times hauling cabs in London and ending with a peaceful rest in the country. Each phase of his story brings him many stories of compassion, but he also gives many accounts of cruelty. The chapters each have a lesson inside them that relates to the sympathetic and insightful ways that people ought to behave.
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  • What Is the Theme of "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry?

    Q: What Is the Theme of "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry?

    A: O. Henry's short story, "The Last Leaf," touches on themes of treasuring life and feelings of hope and faith. The story focuses on how people perceive mortality and even brings up larger themes on the existence of God and the meaning of human fate.
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  • How Many People Died in "Romeo and Juliet?"

    Q: How Many People Died in "Romeo and Juliet?"

    A: Six people died in the play "Romeo and Juliet" - Mercutio, Tybalt, Lady Montague, Paris, Romeo and Juliet. The tragic suicides of star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet are the most famous deaths in the play.
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