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The book "Black Beauty" is an autobiographical story told from the perspective of Black Beauty: the main character who is a spirited stallion. "Black Beauty" tells the story of Black Beauty’s life in several phases, beginning with his birth then journeying through his life as a foal, a yearling and ultimately as a mature stallion.

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  • How does Huck get to the Grangerfords?

    Q: How does Huck get to the Grangerfords?

    A: Huckleberry Finn stumbles upon the Grangerfords' house after a steamboat wrecks the raft that he and Jim were using to navigate their way to the town of Cairo. Huck and Jim realize that they must have passed the city of Cairo in the fog during the previous night.
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  • What reason does Macbeth give for killing Duncan's two guards?

    Q: What reason does Macbeth give for killing Duncan's two guards?

    A: Macbeth kills the two drunken guards in a rage, claiming that it was them that had killed King Duncan, as they were covered in the king's blood. This happens in Act II, Scene III in William Shakespeare's tragedy, "Macbeth."
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  • What was life like for the migrant workers in "Of Mice and Men"?

    Q: What was life like for the migrant workers in "Of Mice and Men"?

    A: Life is very difficult for the migrant workers in "Of Mice and Men," according to a plot synopsis from SparkNotes.com. Life is very strict on the ranch, which is why George must lie to the boss, promising him that Lennie is not going to be a problem. All of the workers must deal with the boss's son Curley, who is possessive of his flirtatious wife.
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  • What is the setting of the "Most Dangerous Game"?

    Q: What is the setting of the "Most Dangerous Game"?

    A: The setting of "The Most Dangerous Game" is in the Caribbean on both a Brazil-bound yacht as well as a dangerous and mysterious Caribbean island. The action of the short story takes place soon after World War I.
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  • What is the theme of "The Snowstorm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson?

    Q: What is the theme of "The Snowstorm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson?

    A: Ralph Waldo Emerson’s poem “The Snowstorm” is about the power of nature, objectified by the storm, to create great beauty and do harm with indifference. Although the storm isolates and hides, when seen in the sunlight, the drifts and ice create great beauty. This allows people to transcend the physical through the philosophical to the beauty of the universe, which is that of Nature and the Soul.
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  • What are some examples of romanticism in "Frankenstein"?

    Q: What are some examples of romanticism in "Frankenstein"?

    A: The novel "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley contains several romanticist themes, including the enthusiastic and almost surreal characterization of nature. Additionally, Shelley's characters are driven by larger-than-life emotions, another staple component of romanticist fiction. Finally, there is the call for humans to press the boundaries of their own existence and understanding.
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  • How many books did Edgar Allan Poe write?

    Q: How many books did Edgar Allan Poe write?

    A: According to the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe published in his lifetime one novel and three collections of his tales. His vast literary contributions include poems, stories, essays, sketches and letters.
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  • Is "The Scarlet Letter" a protofeminist novel?

    Q: Is "The Scarlet Letter" a protofeminist novel?

    A: "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1850, is considered protofeminist as the story features feminist themes before the concept of feminism was known. The concept of feminism was not known prior to the 20th century.
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  • Why did Charles Dickens write "A Christmas Carol"?

    Q: Why did Charles Dickens write "A Christmas Carol"?

    A: There were two significant reasons why Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol." The first was the fact that his latest book was not selling and led him into serious financial trouble. The second was a visit to the industrial city of Manchester in 1843, where he saw the plight of the poor and felt the need to comment on the wide gap between them and the rich.
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  • What is Macbeth's tragic flaw?

    Q: What is Macbeth's tragic flaw?

    A: Macbeth's tragic flaw is his ambition. He is willing to do anything it takes to become the king, and his wife encourages his evil deeds.
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  • What is the moral of the fairy tale, "The Princess and the Pea?"

    Q: What is the moral of the fairy tale, "The Princess and the Pea?"

    A: There are several morals that can be derived from "The Princess and the Pea." However, the most popular one is that people should not judge others based on their appearances.
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  • What is a brief summary of "Hamlet"?

    Q: What is a brief summary of "Hamlet"?

    A: The play "Hamlet," written by William Shakespeare, follows the journey of Prince Hamlet of Denmark as he seeks revenge on his deceased uncle, Claudius. "Hamlet," which is also called "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark," was written by Shakespeare between the years 1599 and 1602. This play is among Shakespeare's most powerful and popular works.
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  • How did Hercules die?

    Q: How did Hercules die?

    A: Though the stories of Hercules' death have varying details, all recount that the Greek hero suffered the effects of an intense poison and ultimately died on a funeral pyre. His immortal spirit ascended to Olympus to stay with the gods.
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  • What is an example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    Q: What is an example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    A: An example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare is when Caesar is warned about the Ides of March by the soothsayer. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something that the character does not know. In this scene, the audience recognizes that the Ides of March is the day Caesar dies, but Caesar himself does not know this and ignores the warning, which results in his death.
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  • What are some literary devices in "Wuthering Heights"?

    Q: What are some literary devices in "Wuthering Heights"?

    A: Some literary devices used in Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" include motifs and symbolism. Some of the novel's motifs include doubling and repetition, and some symbols in the book include moors and ghosts.
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  • What are interesting facts about Mary Wollstonecraft?

    Q: What are interesting facts about Mary Wollstonecraft?

    A: English writer Mary Wollstonecraft was born in London, England, on April 27, 1759, and died on September 10, 1797; she traveled through Europe during her life, eventually returning to the city of her birth, and earned a reputation as a passionate advocate for the advancement of women's rights. Mary Wollstonecraft, a self proclaimed feminist, eventually married and assumed the name of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin. She outlived an attempt at suicide in 1795 following a painful breakup with her lover, American Captain Gilbert Imlay, and gave birth to a daughter a year earlier, in 1794.
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  • How many books did Shakespeare write?

    Q: How many books did Shakespeare write?

    A: Although William Shakespeare did not write actual books, he wrote 38 plays during his career as a playwright. His earliest written plays included "Richard III" and "Henry VI."
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  • Why does Juliet ask Romeo not to swear by the moon?

    Q: Why does Juliet ask Romeo not to swear by the moon?

    A: Juliet asks Romeo not to swear by the moon because the moon is always changing its shape and position. Therefore, a promise sworn on the moon could also be prone to changing. Her request is part of the famous balcony scene, which is the second scene in Act II of the play "Romeo and Juliet."
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  • What are the seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno"?

    Q: What are the seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno"?

    A: The seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno" are lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy and pride. Dante crossed paths with souls condemned to eternal damnation as he journeyed through the Inferno, gaining deeper understanding as he studied their plight. The sinners that Dante encountered were being punished for the specific deadly sin which they were most guilty of in life.
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  • How did Shakespeare become famous?

    Q: How did Shakespeare become famous?

    A: Within two years of writing his first play, "Henry VI, Part One," which put him on London's theatrical map, Williams Shakespeare was so famous that established playwright Robert Greene referred to him as an "upstart crow" in a critique of his work. Shakespeare wrote "Henry VI, Part One" while still living in his native Stratford. Shortly thereafter, he moved to London to continue writing plays as well as acting.
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  • What themes are expressed in "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde?

    Q: What themes are expressed in "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde?

    A: Themes expressed in "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde include sacrifice, mercy, repression, compassion, love, poverty and riches. The fairy tale focuses on the statue of the Happy Prince who watches over a town and weeps as some townsfolk suffer in poverty.
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