Classics

A:

Jane Austen was born in 1775 in England, on the cusp of the Industrial Revolution. She spent the majority of her adult life in the Regency Period, which began in 1811. During this time, King George IV was named regent; his father, King George III had been declared insane.

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  • What is the name of Thor's hammer?

    Q: What is the name of Thor's hammer?

    A: The hammer of Marvel superhero Thor is called "Mjolnir." According to Marvel tradition, it was made inside the core of a dying star from a substance known as "Uru," a metal from Thor's home. The hammer weighs 42.3 pounds.
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  • How did Shakespeare become famous?

    Q: How did Shakespeare become famous?

    A: Within two years of writing his first play, "Henry VI, Part One," which put him on London's theatrical map, Williams Shakespeare was so famous that established playwright Robert Greene referred to him as an "upstart crow" in a critique of his work. Shakespeare wrote "Henry VI, Part One" while still living in his native Stratford. Shortly thereafter, he moved to London to continue writing plays as well as acting.
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  • What psychological disorders do the Winnie the Pooh characters have?

    Q: What psychological disorders do the Winnie the Pooh characters have?

    A: The characters in the Winnie the Pooh were "diagnosed" by the Canadian Medical Association to be suffering from various psychological disorders, which include obsessive compulsive disorder, dyslexia, depression and schizophrenia. The tongue-in-cheek article that was published in 2000 suggests that while everything seemed ideal in the Hundred Acre Wood, there exists a neurodevelopmental and psychological issues in the idyllic forest that remain unrecognized and untreated.
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  • What are some important Globe Theatre facts?

    Q: What are some important Globe Theatre facts?

    A: The Globe Theatre was a large, round and open-air theater made famous by its connection with the playwright William Shakespeare, who owned a 12.5 percent share in the theater. It was built by Richard Burbage in 1599 on the south bank of the River Thames in London. The Globe Theatre lasted 85 years, burning down once, before it was turned into tenement housing after the Puritans suppressed all stage plays.
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  • What are the names of the Three Musketeers?

    Q: What are the names of the Three Musketeers?

    A: The names of the Three Musketeers are Athos, Porthos and Aramis. The main character of the novel, however, is d'Artagnan, a poor, young adventurer who leaves his home to join the famous Musketeers of the Guard.
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  • How many times is love mentioned in the Bible?

    Q: How many times is love mentioned in the Bible?

    A: The number of times that love is mentioned in the Bible depends on the version of the Bible. In the King James Version, love is mentioned 310 times, 131 times in the Old Testament and 179 times in the New Testament.
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  • What is the book summary of Black Beauty?

    Q: What is the book summary of Black Beauty?

    A: The book "Black Beauty" is an autobiographical story told from the perspective of Black Beauty: the main character who is a spirited stallion. "Black Beauty" tells the story of Black Beauty’s life in several phases, beginning with his birth then journeying through his life as a foal, a yearling and ultimately as a mature stallion.
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  • What is Gatsby and Daisy's relationship?

    Q: What is Gatsby and Daisy's relationship?

    A: Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby are lovers in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby." The relationship between the two characters forms the primary plot of the novel.
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  • Who suspects Macbeth of the murders?

    Q: Who suspects Macbeth of the murders?

    A: In Act 3, Scene 1 of the play "Macbeth," written by William Shakespeare, Banquo becomes suspicious that Macbeth is responsible for Duncan's murder. During this scene, Macbeth becomes fearful of Banquo's suspicions.
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  • What is the theme of "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck?

    Q: What is the theme of "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck?

    A: The theme of the short story "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck is the inequality between men and women and the desire for sexual fulfillment. The story was published in a collection of Steinbeck's short stories titled "The Long Valley", released in 1938.
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  • What are examples of personification in "Hamlet"?

    Q: What are examples of personification in "Hamlet"?

    A: "The world's grown honest" and "For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak / With most miraculous organ" are both quotes from Act II, scene ii that are examples of personification in William Shakespeare's play "Hamlet." Personification is a figure of speech in which inanimate objects are given traits normally ascribed to humans. In the above examples, the world and murder are given human qualities.
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  • What are some literary devices in "Wuthering Heights"?

    Q: What are some literary devices in "Wuthering Heights"?

    A: Some literary devices used in Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" include motifs and symbolism. Some of the novel's motifs include doubling and repetition, and some symbols in the book include moors and ghosts.
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  • What country is Aladdin from?

    Q: What country is Aladdin from?

    A: Aladdin is from China, although he is often presumed to be from a Middle Eastern or Arabian country. The original versions of his story are set in China.
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  • What is an example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    Q: What is an example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    A: An example of dramatic irony in "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare is when Caesar is warned about the Ides of March by the soothsayer. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something that the character does not know. In this scene, the audience recognizes that the Ides of March is the day Caesar dies, but Caesar himself does not know this and ignores the warning, which results in his death.
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  • What is the name of the queen in "Snow White"?

    Q: What is the name of the queen in "Snow White"?

    A: Queen Grimhilde is the name of the queen in "Snow White." In the Disney film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," she is simply referred to as "The Queen."
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  • Why does Gatsby call Nick "old sport?"

    Q: Why does Gatsby call Nick "old sport?"

    A: In F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby," Gatsby calls Nick "old sport" as a term of endearment. The phrase also references Gatsby's manufactured affectations and his transition from poor James Gatz to rich Jay Gatsby.
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  • Who are two writers who have written about Utopian societies?

    Q: Who are two writers who have written about Utopian societies?

    A: Thomas More wrote about utopian society in his 1516 work, "Utopia," as did H. G. Wells in his work, "A Modern Utopia," published in 1905. The term "utopia" was first used in the aforementioned work by More.
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  • How many books did Shakespeare write?

    Q: How many books did Shakespeare write?

    A: Although William Shakespeare did not write actual books, he wrote 38 plays during his career as a playwright. His earliest written plays included "Richard III" and "Henry VI."
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  • How did Hercules die?

    Q: How did Hercules die?

    A: Though the stories of Hercules' death have varying details, all recount that the Greek hero suffered the effects of an intense poison and ultimately died on a funeral pyre. His immortal spirit ascended to Olympus to stay with the gods.
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  • Why does Atticus defend Tom Robinson?

    Q: Why does Atticus defend Tom Robinson?

    A: Atticus Finch defends Tom Robinson because he sees the injustice in what is happening and believes he can reveal this injustice to others. He feels it is the right thing for him to do. He also uses the appointment to expose stereotypes among races and classes of people.
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  • What are some examples of irony in "Lord of the Flies?"

    Q: What are some examples of irony in "Lord of the Flies?"

    A: William Golding's novel "Lord of the Flies" has many examples of irony, several of which are rooted in statements the young boys make about order and culture, which they later fail to uphold. One of the most obviously ironic quotes comes from the violent antagonist Jack who, early in the book, states, "We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages."
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