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Life is very difficult for the migrant workers in "Of Mice and Men," according to a plot synopsis from SparkNotes.com. Life is very strict on the ranch, which is why George must lie to the boss, promising him that Lennie is not going to be a problem. All of the workers must deal with the boss's son Curley, who is possessive of his flirtatious wife.

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  • How many times is love mentioned in the Bible?

    Q: How many times is love mentioned in the Bible?

    A: The number of times that love is mentioned in the Bible depends on the version of the Bible. In the King James Version, love is mentioned 310 times, 131 times in the Old Testament and 179 times in the New Testament.
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  • Who suspects Macbeth of the murders?

    Q: Who suspects Macbeth of the murders?

    A: In Act 3, Scene 1 of the play "Macbeth," written by William Shakespeare, Banquo becomes suspicious that Macbeth is responsible for Duncan's murder. During this scene, Macbeth becomes fearful of Banquo's suspicions.
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  • How many plays and sonnets did Shakespeare write?

    Q: How many plays and sonnets did Shakespeare write?

    A: Most scholars accept that William Shakespeare wrote 38 plays and 154 sonnets. Additionally, he wrote four longer poems. Though he may have written other plays, they are lost to history.
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  • What time period did Jane Austen live in?

    Q: What time period did Jane Austen live in?

    A: Jane Austen was born in 1775 in England, on the cusp of the Industrial Revolution. She spent the majority of her adult life in the Regency Period, which began in 1811. During this time, King George IV was named regent; his father, King George III had been declared insane.
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  • What is the relationship between Harry Potter and the NEWTs?

    Q: What is the relationship between Harry Potter and the NEWTs?

    A: Because Harry Potter did not attend Hogwarts for his seventh and final year, he did not take the N.E.W.T.s, which are the exams young wizards about to graduate must take before finishing school. J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter novels, has given no indication that Harry ever returned to Hogwarts to finish his final year, though she has said that Hermione Granger did so.
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  • Why did Charles Dickens write "A Christmas Carol"?

    Q: Why did Charles Dickens write "A Christmas Carol"?

    A: There were two significant reasons why Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol." The first was the fact that his latest book was not selling and led him into serious financial trouble. The second was a visit to the industrial city of Manchester in 1843, where he saw the plight of the poor and felt the need to comment on the wide gap between them and the rich.
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  • What were the rules of courtship in Othello?

    Q: What were the rules of courtship in Othello?

    A: The rules of courtship in Othello involved keeping a relationship secret, using others to communicate between lovers, giving small gifts as tokens of affection, and giving a more special gift as a secret symbol of engagement. Many of the courtship rules in the time in which Othello was written were offshoots of older medieval traditions.
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  • What are interesting facts about Mary Wollstonecraft?

    Q: What are interesting facts about Mary Wollstonecraft?

    A: English writer Mary Wollstonecraft was born in London, England, on April 27, 1759, and died on September 10, 1797; she traveled through Europe during her life, eventually returning to the city of her birth, and earned a reputation as a passionate advocate for the advancement of women's rights. Mary Wollstonecraft, a self proclaimed feminist, eventually married and assumed the name of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin. She outlived an attempt at suicide in 1795 following a painful breakup with her lover, American Captain Gilbert Imlay, and gave birth to a daughter a year earlier, in 1794.
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  • What is a moral tale?

    Q: What is a moral tale?

    A: A moral or morality tale is a type of story, popular during the 15th and 16th centuries, that uses allegory to portray the struggle between good and evil, often culminating in a lesson. Typically, morality tales featured personifications or avatars of vices and virtues.
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  • What is the name of the boat in "Moby Dick"?

    Q: What is the name of the boat in "Moby Dick"?

    A: The name of the boat in "Moby Dick" is the Pequod, which is also the name of a Native American tribe that lived in the northeastern United States.
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  • What are some examples of foreshadowing in Frankenstein?

    Q: What are some examples of foreshadowing in Frankenstein?

    A: Some of the instances of foreshadowing in Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” include the use of the words fate and omen multiple times during the story. Another example of foreshadowing is when the author refers to the character of Clerval in the past tense, which foreshadows his death.
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  • What is a short summary of "Black Beauty?"

    Q: What is a short summary of "Black Beauty?"

    A: Anna Sewell's 1877 novel "Black Beauty" is an autobiographical memoir told by the horse who gives the book its name that starts with the horse's whimsical days as a young colt before moving on toward tough times hauling cabs in London and ending with a peaceful rest in the country. Each phase of his story brings him many stories of compassion, but he also gives many accounts of cruelty. The chapters each have a lesson inside them that relates to the sympathetic and insightful ways that people ought to behave.
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  • What are the names of the ghosts in "A Christmas Carol"?

    Q: What are the names of the ghosts in "A Christmas Carol"?

    A: The three ghosts named in "A Christmas Carol" are the ghosts or spirits of Christmas past, present, and future. These three ghosts tell Ebenezer Scrooge of his future if he does not change his ways.
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  • What are some examples of romanticism in "Frankenstein"?

    Q: What are some examples of romanticism in "Frankenstein"?

    A: The novel "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley contains several romanticist themes, including the enthusiastic and almost surreal characterization of nature. Additionally, Shelley's characters are driven by larger-than-life emotions, another staple component of romanticist fiction. Finally, there is the call for humans to press the boundaries of their own existence and understanding.
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  • What is Macbeth's tragic flaw?

    Q: What is Macbeth's tragic flaw?

    A: Macbeth's tragic flaw is his ambition. He is willing to do anything it takes to become the king, and his wife encourages his evil deeds.
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  • What are the seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno"?

    Q: What are the seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno"?

    A: The seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno" are lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy and pride. Dante crossed paths with souls condemned to eternal damnation as he journeyed through the Inferno, gaining deeper understanding as he studied their plight. The sinners that Dante encountered were being punished for the specific deadly sin which they were most guilty of in life.
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  • How did Shakespeare become famous?

    Q: How did Shakespeare become famous?

    A: Within two years of writing his first play, "Henry VI, Part One," which put him on London's theatrical map, Williams Shakespeare was so famous that established playwright Robert Greene referred to him as an "upstart crow" in a critique of his work. Shakespeare wrote "Henry VI, Part One" while still living in his native Stratford. Shortly thereafter, he moved to London to continue writing plays as well as acting.
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  • What is Gatsby and Daisy's relationship?

    Q: What is Gatsby and Daisy's relationship?

    A: Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby are lovers in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby." The relationship between the two characters forms the primary plot of the novel.
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  • What are some allusions present in "The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe?

    Q: What are some allusions present in "The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe?

    A: In his poem "The Raven" Edgar Allen Poe makes allusions to two famous sources, the Bible and Greek mythology. Poe alludes to Greek mythology by bringing up Pallas Athena and a Plutonian shore. He alludes to the Bible by mentioning seraphim and referencing the balm of Gilead.
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  • What are examples of asides in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    Q: What are examples of asides in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A: Romeo speaks an aside in Act II, Scene ii of "Romeo and Juliet" when he is standing beneath the balcony where Juliet is speaking, unaware that anyone hears her. Juliet is professing her love for Romeo, and he says "Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?"
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  • How did Hercules die?

    Q: How did Hercules die?

    A: Though the stories of Hercules' death have varying details, all recount that the Greek hero suffered the effects of an intense poison and ultimately died on a funeral pyre. His immortal spirit ascended to Olympus to stay with the gods.
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