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A:

Roald Dahl started writing because he was encouraged to do so by author C.S. Forrester. Dahl is quoted as saying to Willa Petscheck of the New York Times, "[w]ithout being asked to, I doubt if I'd ever have thought to [start writing]."

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  • What is Voltaire famous for?

    Q: What is Voltaire famous for?

    A: Voltaire, born François-Marie Arouet, was one of the most famous of French enlightenment thinkers or philosophers. As an author, Voltaire worked in a variety of different media, including novels, short stories, plays, essays, poetry and pamphlets. His most famous work is likely the scathing satire, "Candide," subtitled "Optimism."
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  • What does "slow and steady wins the race" mean?

    Q: What does "slow and steady wins the race" mean?

    A: The phrase "slow and steady wins the race," comes from the internationally recognised Aesop's Fable "The Tortoise and the Hare." It is a story of two unequal partners who have a race. The story is used to illustrate that consistency and perseverance outweigh speed.
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  • Why did Thoreau leave Walden Pond?

    Q: Why did Thoreau leave Walden Pond?

    A: In his book, "Walden; or Life in the Woods," American naturalist and author Henry David Thoreau explained that he left his life at Walden Pond after two years and two months because he felt he could not afford to spend more time there. From Walden Pond, Thoreau moved back to Concord, N.H.
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  • What were the rules of courtship in Othello?

    Q: What were the rules of courtship in Othello?

    A: The rules of courtship in Othello involved keeping a relationship secret, using others to communicate between lovers, giving small gifts as tokens of affection, and giving a more special gift as a secret symbol of engagement. Many of the courtship rules in the time in which Othello was written were offshoots of older medieval traditions.
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  • Who suspects Macbeth of the murders?

    Q: Who suspects Macbeth of the murders?

    A: In Act 3, Scene 1 of the play "Macbeth," written by William Shakespeare, Banquo becomes suspicious that Macbeth is responsible for Duncan's murder. During this scene, Macbeth becomes fearful of Banquo's suspicions.
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  • Why does Atticus defend Tom Robinson?

    Q: Why does Atticus defend Tom Robinson?

    A: Atticus Finch defends Tom Robinson because he sees the injustice in what is happening and believes he can reveal this injustice to others. He feels it is the right thing for him to do. He also uses the appointment to expose stereotypes among races and classes of people.
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  • What are examples of personification in "Hamlet"?

    Q: What are examples of personification in "Hamlet"?

    A: "The world's grown honest" and "For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak / With most miraculous organ" are both quotes from Act II, scene ii that are examples of personification in William Shakespeare's play "Hamlet." Personification is a figure of speech in which inanimate objects are given traits normally ascribed to humans. In the above examples, the world and murder are given human qualities.
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  • Why did Charles Dickens write "A Christmas Carol"?

    Q: Why did Charles Dickens write "A Christmas Carol"?

    A: There were two significant reasons why Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol." The first was the fact that his latest book was not selling and led him into serious financial trouble. The second was a visit to the industrial city of Manchester in 1843, where he saw the plight of the poor and felt the need to comment on the wide gap between them and the rich.
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  • What is the setting of the "Most Dangerous Game"?

    Q: What is the setting of the "Most Dangerous Game"?

    A: The setting of "The Most Dangerous Game" is in the Caribbean on both a Brazil-bound yacht as well as a dangerous and mysterious Caribbean island. The action of the short story takes place soon after World War I.
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  • What is the definition of a Shakespearean tragedy?

    Q: What is the definition of a Shakespearean tragedy?

    A: A Shakespearean tragedy is defined as a play written by William Shakespeare that tells the story of a seemingly heroic figure whose major character flaw causes the story to end with his tragic downfall. Shakespeare wrote 10 plays that are classified as “Shakespearean tragedies,” including "Hamlet" and "Macbeth."
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  • What is the moral of the story "Aladdin"?

    Q: What is the moral of the story "Aladdin"?

    A: A moral of the story of Aladdin as portrayed in the 1992 Walt Disney movie of the same name teaches that dishonesty does more harm than good in the long-term. According to Movie Guide, the fundamental lesson of the movie is one should remain true to self, accurately representing oneself without pretensions. Another related moral lesson to be learned from "Aladdin" is that personal self-worth trumps external riches.
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  • What is "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway?

    Q: What is "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway?

    A: "In Another Country" is a short story written by Ernest Hemingway. It was published in 1927 as part of his "Nick Adams" series. The story revolves around the character of Nick as he recuperates in a Milan hospital during World War I.
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  • In "Julius Caesar," why does Calpurnia want Caesar to stay home?

    Q: In "Julius Caesar," why does Calpurnia want Caesar to stay home?

    A: In William Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar," Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, begs him to stay home because she dreamed of his murder. At this point in the play, Act 2, Scene 2, Brutus and other Roman senators have decided to murder Caesar when he comes to the Capitol.
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  • What are the morals of "The Wizard of Oz"?

    Q: What are the morals of "The Wizard of Oz"?

    A: One of the morals, or life lessons, one takes from "The Wizard of Oz" is for people to discover their own paths in life, as is stated by Belief Net. This is directly related to the yellow brick road that takes Dorothy to Oz, her goal. It was there in front of Dorothy all along. She just needed to look a little bit harder.
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  • What is the name of Thor's hammer?

    Q: What is the name of Thor's hammer?

    A: The hammer of Marvel superhero Thor is called "Mjolnir." According to Marvel tradition, it was made inside the core of a dying star from a substance known as "Uru," a metal from Thor's home. The hammer weighs 42.3 pounds.
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  • Why does Lady Macbeth pray to be "unsexed"?

    Q: Why does Lady Macbeth pray to be "unsexed"?

    A: Lady Macbeth prays to be "unsexed" because she is preparing to help Macbeth kill Duncan, in order to take control of the Scottish throne. She associates her womanhood with a warm, nurturing spirit, and prays to rid herself of those qualities so that she might help commit the murder.
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  • How did William Shakespeare die?

    Q: How did William Shakespeare die?

    A: The exact cause of William Shakespeare's death is not known, but many historians believe that he fell victim to an outbreak of typhus that took England by storm in 1616. That is the same year that Shakespeare died.
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  • Who are two writers who have written about Utopian societies?

    Q: Who are two writers who have written about Utopian societies?

    A: Thomas More wrote about utopian society in his 1516 work, "Utopia," as did H. G. Wells in his work, "A Modern Utopia," published in 1905. The term "utopia" was first used in the aforementioned work by More.
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  • What did Melville do when he was 21?

    Q: What did Melville do when he was 21?

    A: In 1841, at the age of 21, Herman Melville began his second voyage aboard a merchant ship. His voyage on the whaler Acushnet took him from Massachusetts around Cape Horn to the South Pacific Ocean.
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  • What is a short summary of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"?

    Q: What is a short summary of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"?

    A: "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" tells the story of Tom and his friend, Huckleberry Finn, two boys who get into a lot of trouble. "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" was released in 1876 and written by Mark Twain.
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  • What are interesting facts about Mary Wollstonecraft?

    Q: What are interesting facts about Mary Wollstonecraft?

    A: English writer Mary Wollstonecraft was born in London, England, on April 27, 1759, and died on September 10, 1797; she traveled through Europe during her life, eventually returning to the city of her birth, and earned a reputation as a passionate advocate for the advancement of women's rights. Mary Wollstonecraft, a self proclaimed feminist, eventually married and assumed the name of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin. She outlived an attempt at suicide in 1795 following a painful breakup with her lover, American Captain Gilbert Imlay, and gave birth to a daughter a year earlier, in 1794.
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