Classics

A:

Within two years of writing his first play, "Henry VI, Part One," which put him on London's theatrical map, Williams Shakespeare was so famous that established playwright Robert Greene referred to him as an "upstart crow" in a critique of his work. Shakespeare wrote "Henry VI, Part One" while still living in his native Stratford. Shortly thereafter, he moved to London to continue writing plays as well as acting.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • Why do we need to study Philippine literature?

    Q: Why do we need to study Philippine literature?

    A: While most Philippine literature was written under the significant influence of the occupying Spanish powers during the 1800s, there is also a viable body of work written in the 20th and 21st centuries that makes an important contribution to world literature, which makes it a worthwhile culture to analyze. Philippine literature includes poetry, metrical romances, educational and religious prose, religious and secular drama and modern nationalist literature.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the morals of "The Wizard of Oz"?

    Q: What are the morals of "The Wizard of Oz"?

    A: One of the morals, or life lessons, one takes from "The Wizard of Oz" is for people to discover their own paths in life, as is stated by Belief Net. This is directly related to the yellow brick road that takes Dorothy to Oz, her goal. It was there in front of Dorothy all along. She just needed to look a little bit harder.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the name of the queen in "Snow White"?

    Q: What is the name of the queen in "Snow White"?

    A: Queen Grimhilde is the name of the queen in "Snow White." In the Disney film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," she is simply referred to as "The Queen."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How many books did Edgar Allan Poe write?

    Q: How many books did Edgar Allan Poe write?

    A: According to the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe published in his lifetime one novel and three collections of his tales. His vast literary contributions include poems, stories, essays, sketches and letters.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What were the rules of courtship in Othello?

    Q: What were the rules of courtship in Othello?

    A: The rules of courtship in Othello involved keeping a relationship secret, using others to communicate between lovers, giving small gifts as tokens of affection, and giving a more special gift as a secret symbol of engagement. Many of the courtship rules in the time in which Othello was written were offshoots of older medieval traditions.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the moral of the fairy tale, "The Princess and the Pea?"

    Q: What is the moral of the fairy tale, "The Princess and the Pea?"

    A: There are several morals that can be derived from "The Princess and the Pea." However, the most popular one is that people should not judge others based on their appearances.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How many plays and sonnets did Shakespeare write?

    Q: How many plays and sonnets did Shakespeare write?

    A: Most scholars accept that William Shakespeare wrote 38 plays and 154 sonnets. Additionally, he wrote four longer poems. Though he may have written other plays, they are lost to history.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why does Juliet ask Romeo not to swear by the moon?

    Q: Why does Juliet ask Romeo not to swear by the moon?

    A: Juliet asks Romeo not to swear by the moon because the moon is always changing its shape and position. Therefore, a promise sworn on the moon could also be prone to changing. Her request is part of the famous balcony scene, which is the second scene in Act II of the play "Romeo and Juliet."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf?

    Q: What is the theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf?

    A: The theme of "A Haunted House" by Virginia Woolf is the treasure of love. The tone of the story is lighthearted and playful.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What reason does Macbeth give for killing Duncan's two guards?

    Q: What reason does Macbeth give for killing Duncan's two guards?

    A: Macbeth kills the two drunken guards in a rage, claiming that it was them that had killed King Duncan, as they were covered in the king's blood. This happens in Act II, Scene III in William Shakespeare's tragedy, "Macbeth."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some important Globe Theatre facts?

    Q: What are some important Globe Theatre facts?

    A: The Globe Theatre was a large, round and open-air theater made famous by its connection with the playwright William Shakespeare, who owned a 12.5 percent share in the theater. It was built by Richard Burbage in 1599 on the south bank of the River Thames in London. The Globe Theatre lasted 85 years, burning down once, before it was turned into tenement housing after the Puritans suppressed all stage plays.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno"?

    Q: What are the seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno"?

    A: The seven deadly sins of Dante's "Inferno" are lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy and pride. Dante crossed paths with souls condemned to eternal damnation as he journeyed through the Inferno, gaining deeper understanding as he studied their plight. The sinners that Dante encountered were being punished for the specific deadly sin which they were most guilty of in life.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who are two writers who have written about Utopian societies?

    Q: Who are two writers who have written about Utopian societies?

    A: Thomas More wrote about utopian society in his 1516 work, "Utopia," as did H. G. Wells in his work, "A Modern Utopia," published in 1905. The term "utopia" was first used in the aforementioned work by More.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some allusions present in "The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe?

    Q: What are some allusions present in "The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe?

    A: In his poem "The Raven" Edgar Allen Poe makes allusions to two famous sources, the Bible and Greek mythology. Poe alludes to Greek mythology by bringing up Pallas Athena and a Plutonian shore. He alludes to the Bible by mentioning seraphim and referencing the balm of Gilead.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the theme of "The Snowstorm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson?

    Q: What is the theme of "The Snowstorm" by Ralph Waldo Emerson?

    A: Ralph Waldo Emerson’s poem “The Snowstorm” is about the power of nature, objectified by the storm, to create great beauty and do harm with indifference. Although the storm isolates and hides, when seen in the sunlight, the drifts and ice create great beauty. This allows people to transcend the physical through the philosophical to the beauty of the universe, which is that of Nature and the Soul.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the definition of a Shakespearean tragedy?

    Q: What is the definition of a Shakespearean tragedy?

    A: A Shakespearean tragedy is defined as a play written by William Shakespeare that tells the story of a seemingly heroic figure whose major character flaw causes the story to end with his tragic downfall. Shakespeare wrote 10 plays that are classified as “Shakespearean tragedies,” including "Hamlet" and "Macbeth."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the theme of "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck?

    Q: What is the theme of "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck?

    A: The theme of the short story "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck is the inequality between men and women and the desire for sexual fulfillment. The story was published in a collection of Steinbeck's short stories titled "The Long Valley", released in 1938.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the moral of the story "Aladdin"?

    Q: What is the moral of the story "Aladdin"?

    A: A moral of the story of Aladdin as portrayed in the 1992 Walt Disney movie of the same name teaches that dishonesty does more harm than good in the long-term. According to Movie Guide, the fundamental lesson of the movie is one should remain true to self, accurately representing oneself without pretensions. Another related moral lesson to be learned from "Aladdin" is that personal self-worth trumps external riches.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • In which city was "Lord of the Flies" published?

    Q: In which city was "Lord of the Flies" published?

    A: Lord of the Flies was first published in London in 1954. It was written by William Golding, and is a current staple of many high school reading lists.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the theme of "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry?

    Q: What is the theme of "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry?

    A: O. Henry's short story, "The Last Leaf," touches on themes of treasuring life and feelings of hope and faith. The story focuses on how people perceive mortality and even brings up larger themes on the existence of God and the meaning of human fate.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How did Shakespeare become famous?

    Q: How did Shakespeare become famous?

    A: Within two years of writing his first play, "Henry VI, Part One," which put him on London's theatrical map, Williams Shakespeare was so famous that established playwright Robert Greene referred to him as an "upstart crow" in a critique of his work. Shakespeare wrote "Henry VI, Part One" while still living in his native Stratford. Shortly thereafter, he moved to London to continue writing plays as well as acting.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: