Q:

What are examples of similes in "Romeo and Juliet"?

A:

Quick Answer

One example of a simile in William Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" is in Act 1, scene 4, when Romeo says that love "pricks like thorn." Another occurs in Act 2, scene 2, when Romeo says that lover's tongues are "like softest music to attending ears."

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Similes often use the word "like" to make comparisons. Another famous simile in Romeo and Juliet occurs just as Romeo sees Juliet in Act 1, scene 5: "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night / Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear." The "rich jewel" is Juliet, and the "night" is like the dark skin of a native of Ethiopia.

In addition to comparing using the word "like," similes compare with the word "as." The play includes some of these similes as well. For example, in Act 2, scene 2, Juliet expresses the power of her love to Romeo, saying, "My bounty is as boundless as the sea, / My love as deep." In the same scene, Romeo compares the joy that lovers take in each other's presence to the joy that students feel when they are leaving school: "Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from their books, / But love from love, toward school with heavy looks."

Learn more about Classics

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are examples of oxymorons in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    One example of oxymoron in "Romeo and Juliet" comes from Act I, scene i when Romeo says, "O brawling love! O loving hate!" William Shakespeare made plentiful use of oxymorons in his tragedy. An oxymoron is a statement or phrase employing seemingly contradictory terms. Brawling does not seem synonymous with love, nor does loving with hate.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the major character traits of "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    In William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," Romeo is a free-spirited teenager who, at the beginning of the play, is infatuated with a girl named Rosaline to the point of unhealthy obsession. When he meets Juliet, his affections immediately change, and instead of viewing the object of his love objectively and in a shallow manner, as he did with Rosaline, he views Juliet as a radiant beauty worthy of his awe and admiration. Juliet is younger, not quite 14 years old, and when she first meets Romeo, she no longer thinks logically but rather with her emotions and heart, forsaking the rivalry between her family and Romeo's and meeting him anyways in secret.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What foods did Romeo and Juliet eat?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's play, "Romeo and Juliet," mentions in Act 4, Scene 4, "They call for dates and quinces in the pastry." This is the only specific mention of food in the play resembling the typical diet of upper class Italians in the 16th century.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the climax in Romeo and Juliet?

    A:

    The climax in the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare occurs with the deaths of both Romeo and Juliet inside of the Capulet tomb. The climax happens in Act 5, Scene 3, and it is in the same scene that the prince and the parents find the bodies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore