Q:

What are some examples of personification in Macbeth?

A:

Quick Answer

Some examples of personification in Macbeth include the lines "dark night strangles the travelling lamp" (Act 2, Scene 4) and "new sorrows / Strike heaven on the face" (Act 4, Scene 2). Shakespeare often uses personification, which is a literary device by which non-human ideas and objects are referred to as human.

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It is essentially a type of metaphor, used to evoke the strong imagery that Macbeth is known for.

Another key example of personification in the play comes in Act 5, Scene 5, when Macbeth describes life as "but a walking shadow, a poor player." He says this despondently in response to news that the "trees" of Birnam Wood are marching on Dunsinane.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    When was "Macbeth" written?

    A:

    William Shakespeare wrote "Macbeth" in England in 1606. The tragedy was first published in 1636, and it was set in the 11th century in the Middle Ages.

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  • Q:

    How does Lady Macbeth explain Macbeth's behavior?

    A:

    Lady Macbeth accounts for Macbeth's behavior in William Shakespeare's "Macbeth," by saying that he has had this kind of behavior since he was child, and even has seizures during these moments. She essentially tries to explain his behavior away as a mental illness. This occurs during Act 3, Scene 4, when they attend a feast and Macbeth alone sees the ghost of Banquo.

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    What is the conflict in "Macbeth"?

    A:

    Macbeth has two major conflicts. The first is the internal conflict between his morals and his ambition, exemplifying the conflict of Man versus Himself. The second is the struggle between individual's evil interests, personified by Macbeth and Lady Macbeth; and the best interests of the nation, personified by Malcolm and Macduff, or the conflict of Man versus Man. Both conflicts evolve simultaneously throughout the rising action of the play.

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  • Q:

    What happens at the end of Macbeth?

    A:

    At the end of Macbeth, Lady Macbeth commits suicide, Macduff kills Macbeth and Malcolm is hailed King of Scotland. Throughout the 11 scenes in Act V, Macbeth and his wife show that their sanity has been compromised while Macduff, Malcolm and an English-Scottish coalition prepare to war against the castle. Macbeth exceedingly relies on the Weird Sisters' predictions regarding his future, and Lady Macbeth begins sleepwalking as guilt torments her.

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